Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Any of several aromatic Eurasian herbs or low shrubs of the genus Thymus of the mint family, especially T. vulgaris, having small white to lilac flowers grouped in clusters.
  • noun The leaves of T. vulgaris used as a seasoning.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A plant of the genus Thymus.
  • noun Same as herb mastic (which see, under herb).

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Bot.) Any plant of the labiate genus Thymus. The garden thyme (Thymus vulgaris) is a warm, pungent aromatic, much used to give a relish to seasoning and soups.
  • noun a labiate plant (Teucrium Marum) of the Mediterranean religion. Cats are said to be fond of rolling on it.
  • noun Thymus Serpyllum, common on banks and hillsides in Europe.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Any plant of the labiate genus Thymus, such as the garden thyme, Thymus vulgaris, a warm, pungent aromatic, that is much used to give a relish to seasoning and soups.
  • noun poetic virginity, chastity.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun any of various mints of the genus Thymus
  • noun leaves can be used as seasoning for almost any meat and stews and stuffings and vegetables

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English, from Old French thym, from Latin thymum, from Greek thumon.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Ancient Greek θύμον (thumon).

Examples

Comments

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  • '"What herb do young ladies fear most?"

    '"What?" asked Valancy wearily.

    '"Thyme," said Uncle Benjamin, chuckling to himself.'

    -The Blue Castle, by L.M. Montgomery

    February 17, 2008

  • Lovely quote, lovely book. I'm pleased to meet you.

    This is a pretty list. Please feel free to poke around in my Faery Dust lists...there are many flowers hiding in them.

    February 17, 2008

  • "Thyme takes its name from the Greek verb 'to sacrifice' or 'to make a burnt offering.'"

    --Jack Turner, _Spice: The History of a Temptation_ (NY: Alfred A. Knopf, 2004), 233

    December 6, 2016