time immemorial love

time immemorial

Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Time long past, beyond memory or record. Also called time out of mind.
  • n. Law Time antedating legal records.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Time that extends beyond memory or record.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. a time antedating (legal) history, and beyond “legal memory” so called; formerly an indefinite time, but in 1276 this time was fixed by statute as the begining of the reign of Richard I. (1189). Proof of unbroken possession or use of any right since that date made it unnecessary to establish the original grant. In 1832 the plan of dating legal memory from a fixed time was abandoned and the principle substituted that rights which had been enjoyed for full twenty years (or as against the crown thirty years) should not be liable to impeachment merely by proving that they had not been enjoyed before.
  • n. See under Immemorial.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the distant past beyond memory

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Fedele Savio, S.J. the most recent writer on the subject, calls in question nearly every fact related of them except their existince and martyrdom, which are too well attested by their inclusion in so many of the early martyrologies and their extraordinary cult in their native city, of which from time immemorial they have been the chief patrons.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 6: Fathers of the Church-Gregory XI

  • This particular forest has from time immemorial been assigned as the particular game-park of the heir to the crown.

    The Secret Memoirs of the Courts of Europe

  • The conventional thinker will inevitably be shocked by Mrs. Stetson's ungloved handling of a relation which has been from time immemorial regarded as, on the one hand, sacred and beautiful, or, on the other, wanton and unmentionable.

    The Hour and the Woman

  • A wholesome step is taken in replacing the terms ` pleasure 'and ` pain' (subjective categories supposed from time immemorial to account for many sorts of reaction and to be the basis of the learning process) by the more objective terms ` satisfiers 'and ` annoyers'.

    The Journal of Abnormal Psychology

  • Tumbling down abruptly towards the Jordan and the Dead Sea, the mountains of Basan, of Galaad, and of Moab buttress the plateaux of the desert, where from time immemorial the nomad tribes of Bedouin have roamed.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 6: Fathers of the Church-Gregory XI

  • The distinctive human problem from time immemorial has been the need to spiritualize human life, to lift it onto a special immortal plane, beyond the cycles of life and death that characterize all other organisms.

    La insistencia de Jürgen Fauth

  • But by the Barnwell Process of 1430, it was decided that "transcribers, illuminators, bookbinders, and stationers have been, and are wont and ought to be -- as well by ancient usage from time immemorial undisturbedly exercised, as by concession of the Apostolic See -- the persons belong and are subject to the ecclesiastical and spiritual jurisdiction of the Chancellor of the University for the time being."

    Old English Libraries; The Making, Collection and Use of Books During the Middle Ages

  • I think the part which pulpits play in the death of kings is the most ghastly of all the ceremonial: the lying eulogies, the blinking of disagreeable truths, the sickening flatteries, the simulated grief, the falsehood and sycophancies -- all uttered in the name of Heaven in our State churches: these monstrous Threnodies which have been sung from time immemorial over kings and queens, good, bad, wicked, licentious.

    The Profits of Religion: An Essay in Economic Interpretation

  • Gospels: all the authority which he ascribes to it is derived from his persuasion that it was the original text of our First Gospel, and not a distinct Gospel over and above the four universally received from time immemorial in the Catholic Church.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 6: Fathers of the Church-Gregory XI

  • Precious Blood of Jesus Christ, a relic of which has been venerated since time immemorial in the cathedral of Mentone.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

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