Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • intransitive verb To have an earnest, heartfelt desire, especially for something beyond reach.
  • adjective Extending or traveling a relatively great distance.
  • adjective Having relatively great height; tall.
  • adjective Having the greater length of two or the greatest length of several.
  • adjective Of relatively great duration.
  • adjective Of a specified linear extent or duration.
  • adjective Made up of many members or items.
  • adjective Extending beyond an average or standard.
  • adjective Extending or landing beyond a given boundary, limit, or goal.
  • adjective Tediously protracted; lengthy.
  • adjective Concerned with distant issues; far-reaching.
  • adjective Involving substantial chance; risky.
  • adjective Having an abundance or excess of.
  • adjective Having a holding of a commodity or security in expectation of a rise in price.
  • adjective Linguistics Having a comparatively great duration. Used of a vowel or consonant.
  • adjective Grammar Relating to or being the English speech sounds (ā, ē, ī, ō, oo͞) that are tense vowels or diphthongs.
  • adjective Being of relatively great duration. Used of a syllable in quantitative prosody.
  • adverb During or for an extended period of time.
  • adverb At or to a considerable distance; far.
  • adverb Beyond a given boundary, limit, or goal.
  • adverb For or throughout a specified period.
  • adverb At a point of time distant from that referred to.
  • adverb Into or in a long position, as of a commodity market.
  • noun A long time.
  • noun Linguistics A long syllable, vowel, or consonant.
  • noun One who acquires holdings in a security or commodity in expectation of a rise in price.
  • noun A garment size for a tall person.
  • noun Trousers extending to the feet or ankles.
  • idiom (any longer) For more time.
  • idiom (before long) Soon.
  • idiom (long ago) At a time or during a period well before the present.
  • idiom (long ago) A time well before the present.
  • idiom (long in the tooth) Growing old.
  • idiom (no longer) Not now as formerly.
  • idiom (not long for) Unlikely to remain for much more time in.
  • idiom (the long and the short of it) The substance or gist.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • See -ling.
  • An abbreviation of longitude.
  • Same as along: in the phrase long of, sometimes written ‘long of.
  • To belong.
  • Having a long time to run before maturing: as, a long bill; long (commercial) paper.
  • Well-or over-supplied: as, to be long in some commodity or stock. See long of stock, under long.
  • To have a yearning or wistful desire; feel a strong wish or craving; hanker: followed by for or after before the object of desire, or by an infinitive.
  • To long for; desire.
  • To a great extent in space; with much length: as, a line long drawn out.
  • Far; to or at a distance, or an indicated distance.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English longen, from Old English langian; see del- in Indo-European roots.]

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English, from Old English lang; see del- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Aphetic form of Old English gelang; the verb later reinterpreted as an aphetic form of belong.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English long, lang, from Old English long, lang ("long, tall, lasting"), from Proto-Germanic *langaz (“long”), from Proto-Indo-European *dl̥h₁gʰós (“long”). Cognate with Scots lang ("long"), North Frisian long, lung ("long"), Saterland Frisian loang ("long"), West Frisian lang ("long"), Dutch lang ("long"), German lang ("long"), Swedish lång ("long"), Icelandic langur ("long"), Latin longus ("long"), Ancient Greek δολιχός (dolikhos), Russian долгий (dólgij), длинный (dlinnyj).

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English longen, from Old English langian ("to long for, yearn after, grieve for, be pained, lengthen, grow longer, summon, belong"), from Proto-Germanic *langōnan (“to desire, long for”), from Proto-Indo-European *dl̥h₁gʰós (“long”). Cognate with German langen ("to reach, be sufficient"), Swedish langa ("to push, pass by hand"), Icelandic langa ("to want, desire"), Dutch and German verlangen ("to desire, want, long for").

Examples

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