Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Of genuine birth; having a right by birth to any title.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adjective Of genuine birth; having a right by birth to any title.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • A final motive was that it reassigned the discovery of Francis Bacon's authorship from a "mad" American woman to a true-born Englishman, a quiet, retiring man of letters, an Oxford-educated rector from the heart of England.

    "Contested Will"

  • Clearly, for example, it would be an outrage for true-born Americans to be governed by a dirty no-good Mex — oh, wait.

    The International Community is not a fundamentally predatory force « Isegoria

  • Clearly, for example, it would be an outrage for true-born Americans to be governed by a dirty no-good Mex — oh, wait.

    April « 2008 « Isegoria

  • A final motive was that it reassigned the discovery of Francis Bacon's authorship from a "mad" American woman to a true-born Englishman, a quiet, retiring man of letters, an Oxford-educated rector from the heart of England.

    "Contested Will"

  • Up and down England men start to muster their forces and consider whether they would do better under a hated French queen with a true-born baby prince in her arms, or to follow the handsome and beloved Englishman, Richard of York, to wherever his ambition may take him.

    The Red Queen

  • A final motive was that it reassigned the discovery of Francis Bacon's authorship from a "mad" American woman to a true-born Englishman, a quiet, retiring man of letters, an Oxford-educated rector from the heart of England.

    "Contested Will"

  • Up and down England men start to muster their forces and consider whether they would do better under a hated French queen with a true-born baby prince in her arms, or to follow the handsome and beloved Richard of York.

    The White Queen

  • Up and down England men start to muster their forces and consider whether they would do better under a hated French queen with a true-born baby prince in her arms, or to follow the handsome and beloved Richard of York.

    The White Queen

  • Up and down England men start to muster their forces and consider whether they would do better under a hated French queen with a true-born baby prince in her arms, or to follow the handsome and beloved Richard of York.

    The White Queen

  • Intrust it to me, — under seal if you will, — and if such points he established, I will pledge my word as a — as a — as an honest man and a true-born Englishman, that the

    Anne of Geierstein

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