Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Any of several bulbous plants of the genus Tulipa, native chiefly to Asia and widely cultivated for their showy, variously colored flowers.
  • n. The flower of any of these plants.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A type of flowering plant, genus Tulipa.
  • n. The flower of this plant.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Any plant of the liliaceous genus Tulipa. Many varieties are cultivated for their beautiful, often variegated flowers.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A plant of the genus Tulipa, of which several species are well-known garden bulbs with highly colored bell-shaped flowers, blooming in spring.
  • n. In ordnance, a bell-shaped outward swell of the muzzle of a gun, as a rule abandoned in modern ordnance.
  • n. A liliaceous plant, Bæometra columellaris (Tulipa Breyniana) of the Cape of Good Hope.
  • n. In California, same as butterfly-tulip: see above.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. any of numerous perennial bulbous herbs having linear or broadly lanceolate leaves and usually a single showy flower

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

French tulipe, alteration of tulipan, from Ottoman Turkish tülbend, muslin, gauze, turban (from the shape of the opened flower), from Persian dulband, turban.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Modern Latin tulipa, from Turkish tülbent ("fine muslin, turban"), from Persian دلبند (dolband), also the root of turban; cognate with Mazandarani تولیپ ("tulip").

Examples

Comments

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  • The tulips should be behind bars like dangerous animals;

    They are opening like the mouth of a great African cat.

    from "Tulips," Sylvia Plath

    March 26, 2008