Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Not firm; not strong or stable; feeble; infirm.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adjective rare Infirm.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective infirm

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adjective (of soil) unstable
  • adjective not firmly or solidly positioned

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

un- +‎ firm

Examples

  • I felt like my stomach had turned to Jell-O inside me, all quivery and unfirm.

    SCANDAL

  • I felt like my stomach had turned to Jell-O inside me, all quivery and unfirm.

    SCANDAL

  • I felt like my stomach had turned to Jell-O inside me, all quivery and unfirm.

    SCANDAL

  • I felt like my stomach had turned to Jell-O inside me, all quivery and unfirm.

    SCANDAL

  • As far as supplying energy to the neighbouring countries is concerned this amounts to approximately 4% of the energy generated and most of this relates to “unfirm contractual” obligations, which means essentially that when the country experiences a shortage we very quickly stop electricity supplies to our neighbours.

    Speech by the Chairperson of the Portfolio Committee on Public Enterprises, Fatima Chohan, during the Joint Sitting Debate on National Electricity Challenges facing South Africa

  • Lack of expansion has also resulted in networks being overloaded and capacity becoming increasingly unfirm.

    ANC Daily News Briefing

  • In dealing with the Soviet Union, in trying to analyze its objectives and capabilities, we continue to tread, as George Kennan wrote in his diary in 1950, “in the unfirm substance of the imponderables.”

    Interpretations of American History

  • In dealing with the Soviet Union, in trying to analyze its objectives and capabilities, we continue to tread, as George Kennan wrote in his diary in 1950, “in the unfirm substance of the imponderables.”

    Interpretations of American History

  • "The sway of earth _shook_ like a thing unfirm," thousands of houses crumbled to their base, tens of thousands of human beings were buried beneath ruins, or engulfed by the gaping ground.

    Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine - Volume 61, No. 376, February, 1847

  • The springiness might have gone out of his step, and to a certain extent the seat in the saddle was unfirm, and the strength and poise of the body showed signs of abatement, but the fire in the eyes was undimmed and every line of the features was instinct to a wonderful degree with life and vitality.

    The Boy With the U. S. Foresters

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