Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Not mellowed; not fully matured; not toned down or softened by ripeness or length of years.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I pleaded that the reporters were often young men, eager, and unmellowed in their sense of literary art.

    Mark Twain: A Biography

  • The roof rafters are exposed, and the wood colors are raw and unmellowed.

    The Crucible

  • In the same manner, I would recommend neither a raw, unmellowed style, which, (if I may so express myself) has been newly drawn off from the vat; nor the rough, and antiquated language of the grave and manly Thucydides.

    Cicero's Brutus or History of Famous Orators; also His Orator, or Accomplished Speaker.

  • His attitude, the attitude of an old and understanding professor, shaking his head musingly as his tender pupils, unmellowed yet in the autumnal fragrances of life, giggle covertly over the pages of Balzac and Flaubert, over the nudes of Manet, over even the innocent yearnings of the bachelor Chopin.

    Europe After 8:15

  • And yet somehow it seemed to me that it was better than something brand new and unmellowed -- that old book which father had loved and which I loved.

    Lucy Maud Montgomery Short Stories, 1905 to 1906

  • I pleaded that the reporters were often young men, eager, and unmellowed in their sense of literary art.

    Mark Twain, a Biography — Volume III, Part 2: 1907-1910

  • I pleaded that the reporters were often young men, eager, and unmellowed in their sense of literary art.

    Mark Twain, a Biography. Complete

  • These defects are interesting, because they represent the nature of Milton as it was then, noble and disinterested to the height of imagination, but self-assertive, unmellowed, angular.

    Life of John Milton

  • Vengeance ought to ripen slowly in the strong heat of intense wrath, till of itself it falls -- hastily snatched before its time it is like unmellowed fruit, sour and ungrateful to the palate.

    Vendetta: a story of one forgotten

  • These defects are interesting, because they represent the nature of Milton as it was then, noble and disinterested to the height of imagination, but self-assertive, unmellowed, angular.

    Life of John Milton

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