Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Unable to be removed through surgery.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

un- +β€Ž resectable, see resect.

Examples

  • At diagnosis, most patients with NSCLC present with advanced, inoperable (also called unresectable) disease, which is associated with poor prognosis

    THE MEDICAL NEWS

  • Under his leadership, the program's surgeons were able to aggressively resect and cure up to a third of patients who had been identified as unresectable by other institutions.

    Media Newswire

  • At diagnosis, most patients with NSCLC present with advanced, inoperable (also called unresectable) disease, which is associated with poor prognosis8

    The Earth Times Online Newspaper

  • Pfizer shares are trading to the downside Monday, despite news that the Food and Drug Administration approved its cancer drug Sutent to treat progressive, well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic disease.

    Pfizer's Sutent Gets Approval To Treat Rare Cancer

  • For Sutent, the panel voted 8-2 in favor of a similar question for the use of Sutent in patients with "unresectable" pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, or those that can't be removed by surgery.

    Two Drugs for Cancer Get Boost

  • Dr Steven A. Curley, who pioneered the clinical studies that led to FDA approval of radiofrequency ablation to treat unresectable primary and metastatic hepatobiliary malignancies, referred to the method as β€œone of the most exciting developments in years.”

    Curing Cancer, Burning Salt Water | Impact Lab

  • The other, ranpirnase, is in late-stage clinical trials as a treatment for unresectable malignant mesothelioma, a rare and fatal form of lung cancer.

    Brain Cancer Cure May Come From Frogs | Impact Lab

  • For example, many men prefer to die a horrible death rather than partially feminise from hormonal treatment and a bilateral orchidectomy as a treatment for unresectable prostate cancer.

    Archive 2006-01-01

  • On May 5, 2011, the US Food and Drug Association (FDA) approved Afinitor (everolimus) for the treatment of progressive neuroendocrine tumors of pancreatic origin (PNET) in patients with unresectable, locally advanced or metastatic disease.

  • Afinitor (everolimus) was approved in the EU for the treatment of progressive neuroendocrine tumors (NET) of pancreatic origin in patients with unresectable, locally advanced or metastatic disease.

    Reuters: Press Release

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