Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Not pinched; not galled.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective That has not been wrung.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

un- +‎ wrung

Examples

  • MOOS: But they ` re still together, his neck unwrung.

    CNN Transcript Oct 3, 2006

  • “You should never let those troubles touch you so closely,” said his lordship, whose own withers at this moment were by no means unwrung.

    The American Senator

  • At this remark, our uncle changed colour, and looked round the company, conscious that his own withers were not altogether unwrung.

    The Expedition of Humphry Clinker

  • But when the irresistible arguments of the post-boy have prevailed upon them to proceed a mile or two, they will become callous to the first sensation; and being warm in the harness, as the said post-boy may term it, proceed as if their withers were altogether unwrung.

    Waverley

  • His hair an unwrung mop drizzling icy rivers into his ears and eyes, wet clothes plastered to his freezing body, Jason rose and took inventory: The bottle was fine.

    The Deed

  • His hair an unwrung mop drizzling icy rivers into his ears and eyes, wet clothes plastered to his freezing body, Jason rose and took inventory: The bottle was fine.

    The Deed

  • His hair an unwrung mop drizzling icy rivers into his ears and eyes, wet clothes plastered to his freezing body, Jason rose and took inventory: The bottle was fine.

    The Deed

  • He unwrung, as if hearing me demand that secret four per cent discount on commission which they allow antique dealers, as a bribe.

    The Great California Game

  • A virgin by nature and aptitude, as well as by years, untroubled by the bodily agonies that tore most men, but miraculously aware of them and tender towards them, as few are to pains that leave their own flesh unwrung.

    An Excellent Mystery

  • A virgin by nature and aptitude, as well as by years, untroubled by the bodily agonies that tore most men, but miraculously aware of them and tender towards them, as few are to pains that leave their own flesh unwrung.

    An Excellent Mystery

Comments

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  • "'You must not talk about Nelson with two French officers in company,' cried Horse-Flesh. 'It ain't civil.'

    "'Oh, never mind us, sir,' replied Jean-Pierre with a laugh. 'Our withers are unwrung. We have Duguay-Trouin, to name but one.'"

    --Patrick O'Brian, The Nutmeg of Consolation, 205

    March 7, 2008