Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Of, resembling, or containing urine.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Pertaining to urine.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Pertaining to urine, or partaking of its properties.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • (if such were possible!) still hoarding the build of a boy in his twenties, as he soaks, a ramrod with the muscle of a seal in his long tub, vaguely urinous from the Victorian plumbing.

    The Mad Poets Society

  • Hákarl has a pungent, urinous, fishy odor that causes most newbies to gag.

    You Eat That?

  • I inhale the vaguely urinous air of the subway car.

    The Quiet Room by Doug Holder

  • Will was loved for his vivid colors, the creation colors of the Edenlike islands, including the urinous mango-juice yellow, green from crushed hibiscus leaves, dusty purple from wild plum trees on Java, and a peculiar russet in his _Country Road_, _Kamuela_ was a pigment of red clay he had scraped from the very earth he had depicted.

    Beard

  • Do not allow yourself the comfort of an easy road, a road that is devoid of risk and genuine inspiration, because one day all too soon, you're going to wake up in a room that smells of formaldehyde -- a urinous, lonely room with floral-print wallpaper and a window that looks out on a solitary bare oak tree.

    Brad Listi: Unsolicited Advice

  • And sometime later I sat on the floor in a urinous Oakland motel room and tried to cry.

    Life As We Know It

  • This material was asphalt, the limitations of which soon became obvious: not only did asphalt create a dark and gloomy impression, but it retained moisture and urinous smells.

    Bedlam

  • Here there was a small urinous courtyard littered with feathers, vegetable peelings, blood.

    The Satanic Verses

  • Dead breaths I living breathe, tread dead dust, devour a urinous offal from all dead.

    Ulysses

  • "Dictionaire des Sciences Médicales" by Patissier, wherein a man lost penis and scrotum through gangrene, induced by urinous infiltration, may all in the origin be due, if not to the immediate, to the remote effects of the presence of the prepuce.

    History of Circumcision from the Earliest Times to the Present Moral and Physical Reasons for its Performance

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