Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The act of prophesying.
  • n. A prediction; a prophecy.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Prediction, prophecy.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Prediction; prophecy.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The act of prophesying; prediction; prophecy.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. knowledge of the future (usually said to be obtained from a divine source)

Etymologies

vaticinate +‎ -ion (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Every surmise and vaticination of the mind is entitled to a certain respect, and we learn to prefer imperfect theories, and sentences, which contain glimpses of truth, to digested systems which have no one valuable suggestion.

    Nature

  • Plotinus observes, in his third Ennead, that the art of presaging is in some sort the reading of natural letters denoting order, and that so far forth as analogy obtains in the universe, there may be vaticination.

    Archive 2005-08-01

  • And in reality he that foretells the motions of the planets, or the effects of medicines, or the result of chemical or mechanical experiments, may be said to do it by natural vaticination.

    Archive 2005-08-01

  • This vaticination, which loses much in the translation, I have given rather fully, as it shows an observant mind.

    Missionary Travels and Researches in South Africa

  • The art is merely Geomancy in its rudest shape; a mode of vaticination which, from its wide diffusion, must be of high antiquity.

    First footsteps in East Africa

  • Yorick scarce ever heard this sad vaticination of his destiny read over to him, but with a tear stealing from his eye, and a promissory look attending it, that he was resolved, for the time to come, to ride his tit with more sobriety. —

    The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman

  • Apollo, the god of vaticination, was surnamed (Greek).

    Five books of the lives, heroic deeds and sayings of Gargantua and his son Pantagruel

  • For the common voice of the philosophers, together with the opinion of the people, asserteth for an irrefragable truth that vaticination is seldom by the heavens bestowed on any without the concomitancy of a little frenzy and a head-shaking, not only when the said presaging virtue is infused, but when the person also therewith inspired declareth and manifesteth it unto others.

    Five books of the lives, heroic deeds and sayings of Gargantua and his son Pantagruel

  • And by the devil's imitation of God's dealing with his church, this became a way of vaticination among the heathen also: Hom. i.

    Pneumatologia

  • As a pro-slavery prophecy, equally dismal and equally confident with the hundreds that preceded it, this new vaticination may safely be left to be practically dealt with by the Race, victimized and maligned, whose real genius and character are purposely belied by those who expect to be gainers by the process.

    West Indian Fables by James Anthony Froude Explained by J. J. Thomas

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  • "Monastrians, of all shades of thought in politics, had agreed in threatening me with many ludicrous misadventures, and with sudden death in many surprising forms. Cold, wolves, robbers, above all the nocturnal practical joker, were daily and eloquently forced on my attention. Yet in these vaticinations, the true, patent danger was left out."
    -R.L. Stevenson, 'Travels with a Donkey in the Cevennes'

    May 3, 2013

  • "Yorick scarce ever heard this sad vaticination of his destiny read over to him, but with a tear stealing from his eye, and a promissory look attending it, that he was resolved, for the time to come, to ride his tit with more sobriety."
    -Laurence Sterne, 'Tristram Shandy'

    September 23, 2009

  • "Archer had been wont to smile at these annual vaticinations of his mother’s; but this year even he was obliged to acknowledge, as he listened to an enumeration of the changes, that the “trend�? was visible."
    - Edith Wharton, 'The Age of Innocence'.

    September 19, 2009