Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Verisimilitude.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Verisimilitude.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • A fashion has prevailed for some years (introduced by the doctors of the perspective and statuary school of action) which sometimes increases the difficulty of giving verisimility to the scene, or rather destroys it altogether.

    The Mirror of Taste, and Dramatic Censor Volume I, Number 3

  • Dryden has himself assigned the following reasons: ” “The plot, the characters, the wit, the passions, the descriptions, are all exalted above the level of common converse, as high as the imagination of the poet can carry them, with proportion to verisimility.

    The Dramatic Works of John Dryden

  • Dryden has himself assigned the following reasons: -- "The plot, the characters, the wit, the passions, the descriptions, are all exalted above the level of common converse, as high as the imagination of the poet can carry them, with proportion to verisimility.

    The Dramatic Works of John Dryden, Volume 1 With a Life of the Author

Comments

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  • (n. obs.): verisimilitude, the appearance of truth, the quality of seeming to be true.

    December 31, 2008