Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb Simple past tense and past participle of vitiate.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adjective ruined in character or quality
  • adjective impaired by diminution

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • By such preference is our superior and supreme regard for Jesus and his word vitiated or invalidated?

    Aurelian or, Rome in the Third Century

  • I have called vitiated air (§ 29), with 4 parts of our fire-air, and placed the bottle, inverted and open, in a vessel which was also filled with a solution of liver of sulphur.

    Discovery of Oxygen, Part 2

  • The attraction which the blood has for phlogiston cannot be so strong as that with which plants and insects attract it from the air, and then the blood cannot convert air into aerial acid; still it becomes converted into an air which lies midway between fire-air and aerial acid, that is, a vitiated air; for it unites neither with lime nor with water after the manner of fire-air and it extinguishes fire, after that of aerial acid.

    Discovery of Oxygen, Part 2

  • According to her own notes and this account in today's Sun-Sentinel, Jeck asked whether the rationale for Scalia's well-known opposition to cameras in the Supreme Court was "vitiated" by the facts that the Court allows public visitors to view arguments and releases full argument transcripts to the public, and that justices go out on book tours.

    How Dahlia Lithwick would like you to think about Supreme Court appointments: liberal = moderate, conservative = extreme.

  • The court noted that, as a practical matter, the "all elements" rule informs a doctrine of equivalents analysis by requiring that equivalence be assessed on a limitation-by-limitation basis, rather than from the perspective of the invention as a whole, and that no limitation be read completely out of the claim i.e., "vitiated".

    Archive 2006-11-01

  • Swaraj noted that the atmosphere was "vitiated" and therefore the leaders thought that it was "inappropriate" to attend the lunch.

    Top Headlines

  • The book promotion led Florida Atlantic University student Sarah Jeck to ask Scalia if the Supreme Court's opposition to having its proceedings televised was "vitiated" by, among other things, "Supreme Court justices going out on book tours."

    Think Progress

  • As Tony Mauro explained, Jeck "asked whether the rationale for Scalia's well-known opposition to cameras in the Supreme Court was 'vitiated' by the facts that the Court allows public visitors to view arguments and releases full argument transcripts to the public, and that justices go out on book tours."

    Political Animal

  • According to her own notes and this account in today's Sun-Sentinel, Jeck asked whether the rationale for Scalia's well-known opposition to cameras in the Supreme Court was "vitiated" by the facts that the Court allows public visitors to view arguments and releases full argument transcripts to the public, and that justices go out on book tours.

    Delaware Watch

  • "vitiated" because, shortly after the provision was enacted, the Supreme Court held in,

    Simple Justice

Comments

New comments are temporarily disabled while we update our database.