Definitions

Sorry, no definitions found.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • In another, a lady was lying in bed, tucked up very tight and prim, and staring with much composure at a tripod, with a slop-basin on it; the usual form of washing-stand, and the only piece of furniture, besides the bedstead, in her chamber.

    Pictures from Italy

  • The next thing he saw, and that too puzzled him, was a washing-stand, with ewers and basins, and soap and brushes, and towels, and a large bath full of clean water — what a heap of things all for washing!

    The Water Babies

  • Old fire-guard, old shoes, two fish-baskets, washing-stand on three legs, and a poker.

    A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens, Stave 1 Marley’s Ghost | Solar Flare: Science Fiction News

  • Why am I looking at that cheap tin washing-stand and listening to the whirr of the wretched clock in the corridor?

    The Wife

  • He should have a little table and common chair: these are real luxuries, as all who have tried to write, or seen others attempt it, from a low arm-chair at a washing-stand will readily acknowledge.

    A First Year in Canterbury Settlement

  • Waymarsh fixed on his washing-stand the silent detached stare with which Milrose in person, as it were, might have marked the unexpectedness of a compliment from Woollett, and Strether for his part, felt once more like Woollett in person.

    The Ambassadors

  • Alyosha ran to the washing-stand, wetted the towel, persuaded

    The Brothers Karamazov

  • Once again I raised myself from the window, went over to the washing-stand, and sprinkled some water on the shiny knees of my trousers to dull them a little and make them look a trifle newer.

    Hunger

  • The room contained a bed, table, and chairs, also a fireplace and a washing-stand.

    Erewhon

  • There was no other token of her personality about the room, unless it showed itself in the scrupulous neatness of the scant articles of furniture: a washing-stand, two chairs, a small writing-desk, and the little table near the bed.

    The House of Mirth

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • "Once again I raised myself from the window, went over to the washing-stand, and sprinkled some water on the shiny knees of my trousers to dull them a little and make them look a trifle newer."
    - Knut Hamsun, 'Hunger'.

    July 25, 2009