Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. See aconite.
  • n. Any of several poisonous perennial herbs of the genus Aconitum, especially A. lycoctonum, native to northern Europe, having broad rounded leaves, elongate racemes, and light purple flowers.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Any of several poisonous perennial herbs of the genus Aconitum.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A poisonous plant (Aconitum Lycoctonum), a kind of monkshood; also, by extension, any plant or species of the genus Aconitum. See aconite.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A. plant of the genus Aconitum; aconite or monk's-hood; specifically, A. lycoctonum, the yellow or yellow-flowered wolf's bane, also called badger's-, bear's-, or hare's-bane.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. poisonous Eurasian perennial herb with broad rounded leaves and yellow flowers and fibrous rootstock
  • n. poisonous Eurasian perennial herb with broad rounded leaves and yellow flowers and fibrous rootstock

Etymologies

From wolf + bane, calque of Ancient Greek λυκοκτόνον (lukoktonon), from λύκος (lukos, "wolf") + κτείνω (kteinō, "I kill"). Influenced by Latin lycoctonum. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • The consequences can be fatal if the plant - also known as wolfsbane - is eaten and it can also cause heart complications, muscular weakness, nausea and vomiting.

    NEWS.com.au | Top Stories

  • Use of the herb, also known as wolfsbane or monkshood, has been known since Biblical times and has even featured in a

    Evening Standard - Home

  • The appreciative audience really fueled the energy -- the first row in particular howling with laughter, so much so that Jane the Housekeeper Anderson threw a sprig of "wolfsbane" to the woman who was laughing so hard in the first row.

    Review: The Mystery of Irma Vep

  • But I do not dig graves, only cradles, for wolfsbane and moonflower, evening primrose and columbine.

    Wolves and Butterflies

  • If Erec took Wolfboy along, he would have to bring some wolfsbane to protect himself.

    The Three Furies

  • Erec held the vial of laughter in one hand, and each of them carried some of the wolfsbane.

    The Three Furies

  • He found the wolfsbane on the W shelf and grabbed a handful to put in a bag.

    The Three Furies

  • Erec found a bag for the yellow-flowered wolfsbane and put it into his backpack along with the vial of laughter and the Nitrowisherine.

    The Three Furies

  • Erec rooted through his backpack and found the clump of wolfsbane he had brought with him.

    The Three Furies

  • “Good thing you brought that wolfsbane,” Jack said.

    The Three Furies

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