Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of writ.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • -- Well, and does Louisa grow a fine girl, is she likely to have her mother's complexion, and does Tom polish in French air -- Henry I mean -- and Kenney is not so fidgety, and YOU sit down sometimes for a quiet half-hour or so, and all is comfortable, no bills (that you call writs) nor anything else (that you are equally sure to miscall) to annoy you?

    The Works of Charles and Mary Lamb — Volume 5 The Letters of Charles and Mary Lamb

  • Something of form, which was usual in writs, proclamations, or circular letters, issued by the king, v. 1.

    Commentary on the Whole Bible Volume IV (Isaiah to Malachi)

  • Those petitions -- petitions, rather -- which are called writs of habeas corpus, date all the way back to the 13th century Magna Carta.

    CNN Transcript Sep 28, 2006

  • It is easy to understand what the objects of the writs are and for what ends they were designed.

    Is Quebec A British Province?

  • A John Carlin was unlawfully appointed a constable to serve these writs, that is, make the arrests, and he raised a large body of men to help him; but behind all this, the real object was to drive the remaining

    A Young Folks' History of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

  • The writs are the first step in the repossession process, though many home owners come to an agreement with their bank.

    NEWS.com.au | Top Stories

  • The writs are the first step in the repossession process, though many home owners come to an agreement with their bank.

    NEWS.com.au | Top Stories

  • Prisoners who appeal to federal judges with claims of wrongful conviction are rarely successful in their quests for relief, known as writs of habeas corpus, "the great writ" that is a hallmark of American justice.

    News - latimes.com

  • The failure to file such appeals, called writs of habeas corpus, means death row inmates risk missing their last chance to submit new claims of innocence or evidence that could alter their conviction - or death sentence.

    chron.com Chronicle

  • "Vivid in the memory of the newly independent Americans," for example, "were those general warrants known as writs of assistance under which officers of the Crown had so bedeviled the colonists."

    AfterDowningStreet.org - Bush-Cheney Trials in '09

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