Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb Present participle of wuther.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • This pair neither heard the long 'wuthering' rush, nor saw the white burden it drifted: each seemed conscious but of one thing - the presence of the other.

    Shirley, by Charlotte Bronte

  • It was pouring down in torrents and the wind was "wuthering" round the corners and in the chimneys of the huge old house.

    The Secret Garden

  • It was pouring down in torrents and the wind was "wuthering" round the corners and in the chimneys of the huge old house.

    The Secret Garden

  • It was pouring down in torrents and the wind was "wuthering" round the corners and in the chimneys of the huge old house.

    The Secret Garden

  • Wuthering Heights is the name of Mr. Heathcliff's dwelling, "wuthering" being a significant provincial adjective, descriptive of the atmospheric tumult to which its station is exposed in stormy weather.

    Wuthering Heights

  • ‘Borrascoso’ is a normal Spanish word for stormy, so at a time when the book was set in university exams I received several compositions using ‘wuthering’ to describe the weather: It was a wuthering day or The weather became wuthering.

    12 posts from February 2010

  • Has there ever been a good version of wuthering heights either

    Join the Great Adaptations discussion now!

  • ‘Borrascoso’ is a normal Spanish word for stormy, so at a time when the book was set in university exams I received several compositions using ‘wuthering’ to describe the weather: It was a wuthering day or The weather became wuthering.

    Tens and dozens

  • ‘Borrascoso’ is a normal Spanish word for stormy, so at a time when the book was set in university exams I received several compositions using ‘wuthering’ to describe the weather: It was a wuthering day or The weather became wuthering.

    Tens and dozens

  • Last night, after Chinese leftovers, we ventured out into the wuthering evening, because I couldn't stand to be shut up in the house with all that wind pressing in at the walls.

    "She had no heart so hardened, all under the boughs unbowed."

Comments

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  • "Wuthering Heights is the name of Mr. Heathcliff's dwelling. 'Wuthering' being a significant provincial adjective, descriptive of the atmospheric tumult to which its station is exposed in stormy weather."

    Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte

    December 2, 2007

  • "But you never know what the weather will do in Yorkshire, particularly in the springtime. She was awakened in the night by the sound of rain beating with heavy drops against her window. It was pouring down in torrents and the wind was 'wuthering' round the corners and in the chimneys of the huge old house."

    The Secret Garden by Francis Hodgson Burnett

    December 3, 2007

  • "When I moved wuthering heights to the counter, Edward raised one eyebrow." Eclipse by Stephenie Meyer page19

    October 4, 2010