Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Pertaining to fermentation; of the nature of fermentation. Also zymolytic.
  • noun Same as zymotic disease. See I.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adjective Of, pertaining to, or caused by, fermentation.
  • adjective (Med.) Designating, or pertaining to, a certain class of diseases. See Zymotic disease, below.
  • adjective (Med.) any epidemic, endemic, contagious, or sporadic affection which is produced by some morbific principle or organism acting on the system like a ferment.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective pathology, obsolete Relating to or caused by infection.
  • adjective Of or causing fermentation.
  • adjective pathology, of a disease infectious

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adjective relating to or caused by infection
  • adjective of or relating to or causing fermentation

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • _counteract_ the ravages, of certain classes of diseases (those called zymotic) by inoculating the animal suffering therefrom with what he called an "attenuated" or "domesticated" virus of the given disease.

    Notable Events of the Nineteenth Century Great Deeds of Men and Nations and the Progress of the World

  • On the one hand it was denounced as an epicurean and obnoxious toy from England, designed to corrupt the democratic simplicity of the Republic, and on the other hand it was attacked by the medical faculty as dangerous to health and a certain inviter of “phthisic, rheumatic fevers, inflammation of the lungs and the whole category of zymotic diseases.”

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  • On the one hand it was denounced as an epicurean and obnoxious toy from England, designed to corrupt the democratic simplicity of the Republic, and on the other hand it was attacked by the medical faculty as dangerous to health and a certain inviter of “phthisic, rheumatic fevers, inflammation of the lungs and the whole category of zymotic diseases.”

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  • Life and property, indeed, were secure from violence almost all over the world, zymotic diseases, bacterial diseases of all sorts had practically vanished, everyone had a sufficiency of food and clothing, was warmed in the city ways and sheltered from the weather — so much the almost mechanical progress of science and the physical organisation of society had accomplished.

    When the Sleeper Wakes

  • The infant death-rate among the upper classes in modern civilisations has fallen by more than one-half; while among poorer classes it is already, though slowly, falling: the increased knowledge of the laws of sanitation has made among all highly civilised peoples the depopulation by plague a thing of the past, and the discoveries of the next twenty or thirty years will probably do away for ever with the danger to man of zymotic disease.

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  • War must go, the zymotic diseases must go, hide-bound creeds must go, and a wider charity and sympathy come in.

    In the Noon of Science

  • Taking another branch of the same subject, the causes of zymotic diseases being traced to controllable sources, he said: Drs. Klebs and

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 358, November 11, 1882

  • Frankfort-on-the-Main, at Dantzic, and at Hamburg, where similar results obtained of a heavy zymotic mortality previous to the sewering of the cities, and a lighter mortality on the completion of the works.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 358, November 11, 1882

  • Devon, excluding large towns, averaged 17.7 per 1,000; and the deaths from the principal zymotic diseases in the towns were more than double those in the rural districts.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 358, November 11, 1882

  • Hence, while we are unable either to account for the cause or to prevent the periodic recurrence of epidemics, the sanitarian has learnt that it is possible to mitigate the severity of the visit; and that, whether these evils arise from the occult causes to which I have alluded, or from other causes, pure air and pure water afford almost absolute safeguards against most forms of zymotic diseases.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 358, November 11, 1882

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