Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • suffix In the manner of; resembling: Lincolnesque.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • suffix In the style or manner of; appended to nouns, especially proper nouns, and forming adjectives.
  • suffix Resembling; appended to nouns, especially proper nouns, and forming adjectives.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • A suffix of certain words from the French, Italian, and Spanish. It denotes manner or style; like.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • A termination in adjectives of French or other Romance origin, meaning ‘having the style or manner of,’ as in grotcsque, picturesq ue, arabesque, Moresque, Dantesque, etc.

Etymologies

French, from Italian -esco, from Vulgar Latin *-iscus, of Germanic origin.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From French -esque ("-ish, -ic, -esque"), from Italian -esco, from Latin -iscus, of Germanic origin, from Lombardic -isc ("-ish"), from Proto-Germanic *-iskaz (“-ish”), from Proto-Indo-European *-iskos. Cognate with Old High German -isc (German -isch), Old English -isc, Old Norse -iskr, Gothic -𐌹𐍃𐌺𐍃 (-isks). More at -ish. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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