Definitions

Sorry, no definitions found.

Etymologies

From Anglo-Norman Allemaine, Almaine et al., Old French Alemaigne, from Late Latin Alamannia ("territory of the Alamanni tribe"), from Alemannī, Allemannī, of Germanic origin probably corresponding to all + men. Compare Alemannic. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Of the fourteen hundred men whom the metropolis sent forth on this occasion, eight hundred, armed in fine corselets, bore the long Moorish pike; two hundred were halberdiers wearing a different kind of armour, called Almain rivets; and the gunners, or musketeers, were equipped in shirts of mail, with morions or steel caps.

    Memoirs of the Court of Queen Elizabeth

  • Almain, which is called the Holy Roman Empire, of which so many priests are princes! — they are done, and neither ban nor monition is issued against a race of sorcerers, who, from age to age, go on triumphing in their necromancy!’

    Anne of Geierstein

  • Why, he drinks you, with facility, your Dane dead drunk; he sweats not to overthrow your Almain; he gives your Hollander a vomit, ere the next pottle can be filled.

    Othello, the Moore of Venice

  • Afterwards he combed his head with an Almain comb, which is the four fingers and the thumb.

    Five books of the lives, heroic deeds and sayings of Gargantua and his son Pantagruel

  • In matter of musical instruments, he learned to play upon the lute, the virginals, the harp, the Almain flute with nine holes, the viol, and the sackbut.

    Five books of the lives, heroic deeds and sayings of Gargantua and his son Pantagruel

  • Sir Eustace being a-horseback laid his spear in the rest and ran into the French battle, and then a knight of Almaine, called the lord Louis of Recombes, who bare a shield silver, five roses gules, and sir Eustace bare ermines, two branches of gules [2], -- when this Almain saw the lord Eustace come from his company, he rode against him and they met so rudely, that both knights fell to the earth.

    Chronicle and Romance (The Harvard Classics Series)

  • The King of Navarre, however, did not greatly appreciate Tremayne, and a short time afterwards Throckmorton writes: 'The bearer, Mr Tremayne, came out of England with intent to see the wars in Almain, or elsewhere, thereby to be better able to serve the

    Devon, Its Moorlands, Streams and Coasts

  • Why, he drinks you with facility your Dane dead drunk; he sweats not to overthrow your Almain; he gives your Hollander a vomit ere the next pottle can be filled.

    Act II. Scene III. Othello, the Moor of Venice

  • In the sixteenth century Almain and Major make but a poor figure in contrast with Torquemada and Cajetan, the leading theorists of pontifical primacy.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 6: Fathers of the Church-Gregory XI

  • Like Almain rutters26 with their horsemen’s staves

    Scene I

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.