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Examples

  • About this time, Otho came to Bedriacum, a little town near

    The Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans

  • All which made the soldiers at Bedriacum full of anger, and eagerness to be led to battle.

    The Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans

  • Bedriacum to a place fifty furlongs off, where he pitched his camp so ignorantly and with such a ridiculous want of foresight, that the soldiers suffered extremely for want of water, though it was the spring time, and the plains all around were full of running streams and rivers that never dried up.

    The Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans

  • As the two first were upon their journey, they met some centurions, who told them the troops were already in motion, marching for Bedriacum, but that they themselves were deputed by their generals to carry proposals for an accommodation.

    The Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans

  • They met in the plain of the Po Valley and defeated the forces of Otho (Apr. 19) in the First Battle of Bedriacum (near Cremona), whereupon Otho, to avert further bloodshed, committed suicide.

    e. The High Empire

  • There he defeated the forces of Vitellius in the Second Battle of Bedriacum and sacked Cremona (late Oct.).

    e. The High Empire

  • Subsequently, in conjunction with Fabius Valens, Caecina defeated Otho at the decisive battle of Bedriacum (Betriacum).

    Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 4, Part 4 "Bulgaria" to "Calgary"

  • And in the field of Bedriacum [744], before the battle began, two eagles engaged in the sight of the army; and one of them being beaten, a third came from the east, and drove away the conqueror.

    The Lives of the Twelve Caesars, Volume 10: Vespasian

  • [744] The battle at Bedriacum secured the Empire for Vitellius.

    The Lives of the Twelve Caesars, Volume 10: Vespasian

  • He heard of the victory at Bedriacum [707], and the death of Otho, whilst he was yet in Gaul, and without the least hesitation, by a single proclamation, disbanded all the pretorian cohorts, as having, by their repeated treasons, set a dangerous example to the rest of the army; commanding them to deliver up their arms to his tribunes.

    De vita Caesarum

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