Big Horn Mountains love

Big Horn Mountains

Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • Drive over the Big Horn Mountains in Wyoming, up past outcroppings of Devonian and Ordovician rock, farther back in time the higher you go, until you reach the top, where, amid granite outcroppings 2 billion years old, a moose is seining his breakfast from a swampy meadow flecked with wildflowers.

    The Custer Syndrome

  • The grass in the valley was fired, and behind the screen of smoke the Sioux and Cheyennes slowly moved away toward the Big Horn Mountains.

    THE AMERICAN WEST

  • They marched through the Big Horn Mountains to the camp of Crazy Horse, where they found food and shelter.

    THE AMERICAN WEST

  • After the great victory on the Little Horn the Sioux and Cheyennes went to the Big Horn Mountains to cut lodge poles.

    THE AMERICAN WEST

  • Between the Big Horn Mountains and Powder River in Wyoming, the homesteaders soon became a political power, controlling Johnson County, with their headquarters in the county seat of Buffalo.

    THE AMERICAN WEST

  • I have two mountains in that country, the Black Hills and the Big Horn Mountains.

    THE AMERICAN WEST

  • It might be they'd go a safe distance and then set to roasting me over a slow fire, but I doubted it; they were riding steady, so it looked like a longish trek across the northern Powder country towards the Big Horn Mountains; that was where the Sioux were mostly hanging their hats these days.

    Flashman and The Redskins

  • Reno had been off on a scout, and had found an abandoned camp ground where there had been several hundred tipis, as well as a heavy trail heading west towards the Big Horn Mountains.

    Flashman and The Redskins

  • Indians that their country was to be occupied by the whites, Red Cloud claimed the whole portion all along the Big Horn Mountains, and sent word to them that the Indians would kill all they met.

    Three Years on the Plains Observations of Indians, 1867-1870

  • Larkin had left the leaders just north of the hills that formed the hooked southern end of the Big Horn Mountains, and expected that in two days 'time they would have come north almost to the junction of Kirby Creek and the Big Horn, near where it was calculated to cross them.

    The Free Range

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