Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The Latin language as used from about 700 to about 1500.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Then, for an encore they did "Boxcars" by REM, "Fa Cé-La" off of the first album, then a killer cover of "What Goes On" by the Velvet Underground.

    Chicago Boyz

  • If insurance companies saw too much power coming from these Boxcars, most of their target audience wouldn't be able to afford a policy.

    Road Test - 2010 Nissan Cube

  • There will be more Boxcars coming our way and until the perfect one arrives, Cube is a very reasonable facsimile.

    Road Test - 2010 Nissan Cube

  • With their top heavy, high center of gravity stance and understeer, Boxcars might seem to some good candidates for rollovers.

    Road Test - 2010 Nissan Cube

  • In their styling target of being as unsexy as possible, Boxcars also have a low cost (under $20K).

    Road Test - 2010 Nissan Cube

  • Boxcars get waylaid in Chicago shipyards and it takes days to get them back on track, by which point the merchandise has gone off.

    The Fruit Hunters

  • Boxcars per light-year is one of MY favorite obscure units of measure.

    Fodder for the Revolution

  • Boxcars on a siding provided living quarters for railroad employees.

    Nothing Like It in the World The Men Who Built the Transcontinental Railroad 1863-1869

  • Boxcars of goods could be imported, and few men or women in town would forget the excitement that arose when word flashed that a cattleman named Messmore Garrett was bringing in four boxcars of steers which he proposed running on the open range.

    Centennial

  • Other prizes went to the Boxcars, whose four awards included those for emerging artist and instrumental group of the year.

    NYT > Home Page

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