Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The doctrine that the state is supreme over the church in ecclesiastical matters.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The spirit, principles, and methods of the Byzantines, especially with reference to literature and art; the manifestation of Byzantine characteristics.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the doctrine that the state is supreme over the church in ecclesiastical matters

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Mr. Morgenthau uses the word Byzantinism in characterizing my books.

    In with LBJ

  • Of affinity with the idea of Byzantinism is that as frequently occurring idea in German court and ordinary life conveyed by the word

    William of Germany

  • "Byzantinism" of Henry's reign, and possibly the objection to female sovereigns was strengthened by the prevalent respect for Roman imperial and

    Henry VIII.

  • This oriental ceremonial, so marked a feature of late "Byzantinism," involved, as one of its principles, difficulty of access to the Emperor, who, living in the retirement of his palace, was tempted to trust less to his eyes than his ears, and saw too little of public affairs.

    The Great Events by Famous Historians, Volume 03

  • It must be confessed, however, that certain influences darkened the style even before it had reached maturity; chief among these was a gloomy hierarchical splendour, and a ritual rigidity, which to-day we yet refer to, quite properly, as Byzantinism.

    Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 4, Part 4 "Bulgaria" to "Calgary"

  • It is evident that the Fra went through the world with his eyes open, looking for beauty wherever it was visible; and in his works, at least, there is no lingering trace of Byzantinism.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 01, No. 01, November, 1857 A Magazine of Literature, Art, and Politics

  • Indeed Byzantinism was never a Hohenzollern failing.

    William of Germany

  • The Emperor naturally knows nothing of such a thing, for there is no one superior to him in the Empire in point of rank, and he is much too modern, too well educated, and of too kindly and liberal a nature to encourage or permit Byzantinism towards him on the part of others.

    William of Germany

  • Byzantinism and (2) thinking that the art of painting _began_ with

    Gilbert Keith Chesterton

  • It seems incredible that the opinions and judgements one reads in this work are really Döllinger's own; the reader is haunted by suspicion that he has before him a remarkable mixture of Byzantinism and hypocrisy.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 5: Diocese-Fathers of Mercy

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