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Examples

  • In a French court, a trial opened today in a suit brought by the Grand Mosque of Paris and the Union of French Islamic Organizations against the publication Charlie Hebdo which is accused of inciting racial hatred by reprinting the Danish caricatures or the Prophet Muhammad.

    Archive 2007-02-01

  • Defending Charlie Hebdo and our ultra-liberal world from its 'defectives, maniacs, fanatics.'

    A French Lesson in Free Speech

  • Shortly after the death of John Paul II, French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo led with a caricature of the Pope stumbling through an empty, Heaven-free afterlife.

    A French Lesson in Free Speech

  • Getty Images Defending Charlie Hebdo and our ultra-liberal world from its 'defectives, maniacs, fanatics.'

    A French Lesson in Free Speech

  • In the bombing of the French newspaper, Charlie Hebdo, for publishing material offensive to Muslims, the French and other European countries are discovering that there is no grey area in free speech.

    How Does One Say 'Freedom of Speech' in French?

  • Those "troublemakers"who did speak up, like the writers at Charlie Hebdo, were prescient and protective, and they should always be encouraged, not silenced.

    How Does One Say 'Freedom of Speech' in French?

  • Neither, it is hoped, do the French see us all as portrayed on the front cover of the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, showing an overweight, underdressed woman with a stomach piercing and "Fuck Off" tattooed on her arm with a raddled-looking man in a crumpled suit and bowler hat.

    Eurozone crisis fails to ignite French animosity against 'les rosbifs'

  • Charlie Hebdo, known in France for its biting humor, had dubbed its latest issue "Shariah Weekly," in a reference to the Islamic legal code, and put a caricature of the prophet Muhammad on the front page, quoting him promising "100 lashes if you don't die from laughter."

    Fire Guts Headquarters of French Satiric Weekly

  • PARIS—The offices of French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo were gutted by fire Tuesday night, officials said, hours before a special issue of the weekly that features the prophet Muhammad appeared on newsstands.

    Fire Guts Headquarters of French Satiric Weekly

  • However, some groups questioned Charlie Hebdo's decision to publish an image of the prophet Muhammad.

    Fire Guts Headquarters of French Satiric Weekly

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