Chiltern Hundreds love

Chiltern Hundreds

Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • A tract of crown land in Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire, England, to which is attached the nominal office of steward. As members of Parliament cannot resign, when they wish to go out they accept this stewardship, which legally vacates their seats.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • See hundred, n.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Then Phineas for the first time expressed an opinion that he would resign his seat — that he would take the Chiltern Hundreds, and retire altogether from public life.

    Phineas Redux

  • Apply for the Chiltern Hundreds and retire into public life.

    Ulysses

  • In 1794 the trial came to a close; the thanks of the House were formally voted to the managers of the impeachment; and when the scene was over Burke applied for the Chiltern Hundreds.

    Burke

  • A few days later, Peel accepted the Chiltern Hundreds, and after some deliberation allowed himself to be again brought forward for re-election.

    The Life of William Ewart Gladstone, Vol. 1 (of 3) 1809-1859

  • Then Phineas for the first time expressed an opinion that he would resign his seat -- that he would take the Chiltern Hundreds, and retire altogether from public life.

    Phineas Redux

  • Then Phineas for the first time expressed an opinion that he would resign his seat, -- that he would take the Chiltern Hundreds, and retire altogether from public life.

    Phineas Redux

  • Veneering will accept the Chiltern Hundreds, that the legal gentleman in

    Our Mutual Friend

  • He should have taken the Chiltern Hundreds, and immediately informed them that he had done so.

    The Greville Memoirs A Journal of the Reigns of King George IV and King William IV, Volume 1 (of 3)

  • Vivian, in a feeble, irresolute tone, asked if there was no possibility of his being allowed to decline the place that was offered him, and suggested that he could take a middle course; to avoid voting against his lordship's wishes, he could, and he believed that he would, accept of the Chiltern Hundreds, and go out of parliament for the session.

    Tales and Novels — Volume 05

  • The independent member having taken the Chiltern Hundreds, vacates his seat: a new election comes on directly: the Luttridges are to bring in Freke -- not Harriot's cousin -- they have cut him, -- but her husband, who is now to commence senator: he is to come in for the county, upon condition that Luttridge shall have Freke's borough.

    Tales and Novels — Volume 03

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