Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • Darnley, Lord. Title of Henry Stew·art or Stu·art (sto͞oˈərt, styo͞oˈ-) 1545-1567. Scottish nobleman and second husband (1565-1567) of Mary Queen of Scots. He plotted to kill David Rizzio, Mary's secretary, in 1566 and was himself murdered the following year, possibly at the urging of Mary's lover, the Earl of Bothwell.

Etymologies

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Examples

  • There is, in most of Swinburne's plays, some scene or passage of vital dramatic quality, and in _Bothwell_ there is one scene, the scene leading to the death of Darnley, which is among the great single scenes in drama.

    Figures of Several Centuries

  • Her favourite dogs are collies, and she possesses a magnificent specimen in "Darnley," who is now being exhibited at the Agricultural Hall dog show.

    The Idler Magazine, Volume III, April 1893 An Illustrated Monthly

  • "Darnley" is a beautiful black and tan in colour, with heavy white ruff.

    The Idler Magazine, Volume III, April 1893 An Illustrated Monthly

  • In point of publication, "Darnley" is that work by Mr. James which follows

    The Watchers of the Plains A Tale of the Western Prairies

  • Irving insisted that "Darnley" came naturally in sequence, and this opinion being supported by Sir Walter Scott, the author set about the work.

    The Watchers of the Plains A Tale of the Western Prairies

  • As a historical romance "Darnley" is a book that can be taken up pleasurably again and again, for there is about it that subtle charm which those who are strangers to the works of G.P. R. James have claimed was only to be imparted by Dumas.

    The Watchers of the Plains A Tale of the Western Prairies

  • Irving insisted that "Darnley" came naturally in sequence, and this opinion being supported by Sir

    My Friend the Chauffeur

  • In point of publication, "Darnley" is that work by Mr. James which follows "Richelieu," and, if rumor can be credited, it was owing to the advice and insistence of our own Washington Irving that we are indebted primarily for the story, the young author questioning whether he could properly paint the differences in the characters of the two great cardinals.

    My Friend the Chauffeur

  • In point of publication, "Darnley" is that work by Mr. James which follows "Richelieu," and, if rumor can be credited, it was owing to the advice and insistence of our own Washington Irving that we are indebted primarily for the story, the young author questioning whether he could properly paint the difference in the characters of the two great cardinals.

    Hurricane Island

  • "Darnley," 370; comments on Fanny Kemble's beauty, 370.

    Records of a Girlhood

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