Frederick William III love

Frederick William III

Definitions

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. king of Prussia who became involved in the Napoleonic Wars (1770-1840)

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The Holy Alliance was formed between Alexander I of Russia, Francis I of Austria, and Frederick William III of Prussia, and ultimately accepted by all the European rulers except the British prince regent, the pope, and the sultan of the Ottoman Empire.

    1815, March 20-June 22

  • The house, built in 1819, was the gift of the Prussian king Frederick William III to his son-in-law, the later Russian czar Nicholas I, and his wife Charlotte and was modeled after a blockhouse in St. Petersburg in which the king and the young married couple had spent happy hours.

    Dangerous Liaisons

  • Frederick William III evinced little desire to plunge his kingdom back into a life and death struggle, while the presence of French garrisons in Berlin and other key Prussian cities and fortresses constituted another reason for caution.

    THE CAMPAIGNS OF NAPOLEON

  • Schwarzenberg had cautiously begun to advance against Bar-sur-Aube as long before as the 26th, on the insistence of the Tsar and Frederick William III.

    THE CAMPAIGNS OF NAPOLEON

  • About this date, Frederick William III left his army and set out for the River Oder, leaving Hohenlohe with the unenviable task of gathering up the fragments of the army and refashioning them into some sort of field force at Magdeburg.

    THE CAMPAIGNS OF NAPOLEON

  • Queen Louise, consort of King Frederick William III, who Napoleon once described as “the only real man in Prussia”

    THE CAMPAIGNS OF NAPOLEON

  • Tsar Alexander had visited Frederick William III at Berlin on October 25 and persuaded the dilatory monarch into signing the Treaty of Potsdam, whereby Prussia promised to undertake “armed mediation” in the war by early December at the latest.

    THE CAMPAIGNS OF NAPOLEON

  • This offer, however, came somewhat too late to check the growing resentment inspired by the blatant increases in French power, and the vacillating Frederick William III began to bend before the new storm.

    THE CAMPAIGNS OF NAPOLEON

  • The fact that at this juncture the Duke of Brunswick was mortally wounded—shot through both eyes as he led forward a regiment of grenadiers to the assault—and that Schmettau was also laid hors de combat largely accounts for the confusion that spread through the Prussian ranks, for Frederick William III neither appointed a new commander in chief nor assumed control himself.

    THE CAMPAIGNS OF NAPOLEON

  • This patently failed to materialize after Jena-Auerstadt; however vacillating Frederick William III might be, the strong will of the Queen of Prussia remained as defiant as before, and consequently Napoleon was robbed of a conclusive success.

    THE CAMPAIGNS OF NAPOLEON

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