Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • In "Fuzzy-Wuzzy," for example, the narrator calls his Sudanese opponent a "big black boundin 'beggar" but salutes him as "a first-class fightin 'man."

    Five Best

  • Epilogue: Cairo, 1899 1. Fuzzy-Wuzzy: Published in the Scots Observer, March 15, 1890, collected in Departmental Ditties, Barrack Room Ballads & Other Verse New York: U.S. Book Co., 1890, 63–66.

    Three Empires on the Nile

  • If you think of such poems as, above all, "The Song of The Banjo," "Fuzzy-Wuzzy," "Danny Deever," "The Road to Mandalay," and many others one might mention, you can understand the music of the verse that holds so many minds enthralled.

    Kipling, The Poet of Empire

  • A young man had recited "Gunga Din" and, wilfully misinterpreting the gratitude of the audience that it was over for a desire for more, had followed it with "Fuzzy-Wuzzy."

    The Girl on the Boat

  • Even so, they might have rushed us if they had had the courage of the North American Indian, or the immortal "Fuzzy-Wuzzy."

    Head Hunters of the Amazon: Seven Years of Exploration and Adventure

  • A young man recited 'Gunga Din' and, wilfully misinterpreting the gratitude of the audience that it was over for a desire for more, had followed it with 'Fuzzy-Wuzzy.'

    Three Men and a Maid

  • (1865–1936) 8207So ’ere’s to you, Fuzzy-Wuzzy, at your ’ome in the Soudan;

    Quotations

  • (1865–1936) 1So ’ere’s to you, Fuzzy-Wuzzy, at your ’ome in the Soudan;

    Quotations

  • QUOTATION: So ’ere’s to you, Fuzzy-Wuzzy, at your ’ome in the Soudan;

    Quotations

  • Fuzzy-Wuzzy, the muskrat lady, she was washing up the dishes so fast that she broke a cup and saucer and dropped a knife and spoon.

    Bully and Bawly No-Tail

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