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Examples

  • Hill said the Genus is a different breed, because it can be used a main phone, with most of the conveniences expected from smart phones, without the bulk of a traditional satellite phone.

    TerreStar Genus, Satellite-Enabled Smart Phone, Coming To AT&T

  • In this popular sense any two classes, one of which includes the whole of the other and more, may be called a Genus and

    A System Of Logic, Ratiocinative And Inductive (Vol. 1 of 2)

  • In this popular sense any two classes, one of which includes the whole of the other and more, may be called a Genus and

    A System Of Logic, Ratiocinative And Inductive

  • AT&T sells an $800 smartphone called the Genus that can switch between the regular wireless network and routing calls through a satellite.

    The Seattle Times

  • AT&T sells an $800 smartphone called the Genus that can switch between the regular wireless network and routing calls through a satellite.

  • Whilst in Division the terms 'Genus' and 'Species' are entirely relative to one another and have no fixed positions in a gradation of classes, it has been usual, in Inductive Classification, to confine the term

    Logic Deductive and Inductive

  • Whether or not you know that the work was inspired by Darwin's "Origin of Species," it's easy to see "Genus" as demonstrating the evolution of both the ballet body and ballet technique.

    NYT > Home Page

  • But the kinetic thrills and sensory overload of "Genus" leave you feeling that ballet, almost despite itself, is moving on.

    NYT > Home Page

  • You can't make the same complaint about Mr. McGregor's "Genus," which sustains a breathless tension from the outset as it puts an astounding succession of superb dancers through the extreme and complex articulations that characterize his choreography.

    NYT > Home Page

  • Wayne McGregor's "Genus," seen as a work in progress, is at first appealing in the sheer novelty of its mechanical contortionism; but the more numerous the hyperextended, acrobatic and sensationalist moves thrown into the mix by Mr. McGregor, the more striking becomes the sense of his expressive aridity: this is choreography as clever stunts.

    NYT > Home Page

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