Henry Bolingbroke love

Henry Bolingbroke

Definitions

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the first Lancastrian king of England from 1399 to 1413; deposed Richard II and suppressed rebellions (1367-1413)

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • He ruled for more than 20 years, but was eventually deposed by his cousin, Henry Bolingbroke.

    Great dynasties of the world: The Plantagenets

  • All the main characters are historical figures, including Richard II, his beloved queen Anne of Bohemia, his mother Joan “the Fair Maid of Kent”, his uncles, advisors and counsellors, his cousin Henry Bolingbroke later Henry IV, his favourite Robert de Vere and the writer Geoffrey Chaucer.

    Within the Hollow Crown, by Margaret Campbell Barnes. Book review

  • When Hal (a wonderful Matthew Macfadyen) throws down his glove to challenge his rival Hotspur to a duel, only to have his father, Henry Bolingbroke, kick it coldly aside, it feels more like a slap than a paternal impulse.

    ALL THE WAR'S A STAGE

  • A gaunt Henry Bolingbroke presides over a joyless court; you can't help hoping Falstaff gets onstage fast.

    ALL THE WAR'S A STAGE

  • The first scene in Shakespeare's Richard II involves accusations by Henry Bolingbroke of the misappropriation of state funds by Thomas Mowbray, during the War in France:

    A Big Stick and a Small Carrot

  • In the course of their quarrels, the gentry and the nobility put aside old codes of civility, and that development, together with certain very striking national events—notably the ouster and probable murder of Richard II by Henry Bolingbroke, at the end of the century—created what Cantor calls a “new dark age of bad behavior.”

    What's interesting about the plague.

  • In the play of Richard II, with which Shakespeare began what was to become a four-play sequence, Henry Bolingbroke, son of the Duke of Lancaster, takes the throne away from his royal first cousin, Richard, and is crowned as Henry IV.

    Shakespeare

  • Consider the peculiar quality of the opening sequence of Richard II, the long build-up of charge and countercharge, claim and counterclaim, challenge and counterchallenge that Thomas Mowbray and Henry Bolingbroke engage in at great length before their sovereign, King Richard II.

    The Mysterian Manifesto: Shakespeare, McGinn and Me

  • Henry Bolingbroke could not gain her for England, and the Duke of Milan in vain urged her to reside in that city.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 18, No. 107, September, 1866

  • Henry Bolingbroke, Duke of Hereford, the King's cousin, accuses Thomas Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk, of treachery to the King and of the murder of the Duke of Gloucester.

    William Shakespeare

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