Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A member of an agricultural people of northern Luzon in the Philippines.
  • n. The Austronesian language of the Ilocano.
  • adj. Of or relating to the Ilocano or their language or culture.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. One of an ethnic group in the Philippines.
  • proper n. A language spoken principally on the island of Luzon.
  • adj. Of or pertaining to the Ilocano.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Of or pertaining to the Ilocanos or their language.
  • n. A member of one of the Malay tribes of the Philippine Islands, inhabiting the extreme northwestern part of Luzon.
  • n. An inhabitant of Ilocos without reference to race.
  • n. The language of the Ilocanos.

Etymologies

Spanish Ilócano, from Ilóko, people who live along the shore (unattested sense), Austronesian people of the Philippines; perhaps akin to luék, luók, cove.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Philippine Spanish, from Ilocos (the name of two provinces), from Tagalog ilog ("river"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • One thing I found interesting - there are "written dialects" or versions of Baybayin which appear to better accomodate languages such as Ilocano, Kampampangan, Tagalog, Bisayan, etc.

    Davao Blogspace

  • Instead, in contextualizing Eileen Tabios's work, we could look into the following: Leona Florentino (1849-1884), the 19th-century Ilocano poet; the unanthologized Tagalog women poets who published in Liwayway and Taliba in the 1920s and 1930s, during the United States occupation of the Philippines (1899-1942); and the binukot, the storyteller from Panay of pre-colonial Philippines.

    PLOTTING MY NEW CAREER: SLACKER-HOOD!

  • There was only one publication in Ilocano that I remember reading and it was quite a racy mag that my Mom disapproved of. lol.

    Writing from the Context of my culture

  • Bannawag, the premier Ilocano magazine, featured in its Sept. 8 issue the Sipag at Tiyaga awardees of sen.

    GANTIMPALA AGAD AWARD, DEP-ED PASSERS, AND THE TNHS FUND-RAISER

  • Languages: Filipino (official; based on Tagalog) and English (official); eight major dialects - Tagalog, Cebuano, Ilocano, Hiligaynon or Ilonggo, Bicol, Waray, Pampango, and Pangasinan

    Philippines

  • Ethnic groups: Tagalog 28.1%, Cebuano 13.1%, Ilocano 9%, Bisaya/Binisaya 7.6%, Hiligaynon Ilonggo 7.5%, Bikol 6%, Waray 3.4%, other 25.3% (2000 census)

    Philippines

  • PhilippinesFilipino (official; based on Tagalog) and English (official); eight major dialects - Tagalog, Cebuano, Ilocano, Hiligaynon or Ilonggo, Bicol, Waray, Pampango, and Pangasinan

    Languages

  • For now, English is the dominant language in business, not Ilocano, Visayan or Tagalog.

    Another Look At Languages In The Philippines (Updated)

  • I believe that even if you use Filipino/Cebuano/Ilocano/another native language as the medium of instruction in your school, you CAN have children who are eager to study, and consequently an intelligent and globally competitive workforce.

    Another Look At Languages In The Philippines (Updated)

  • As the 109th anniversary of his martyrdom is remembered this month, a number of institutions and organizations ingenuously came up with the idea of further popularizing the masterpiece using the true vernacular of the North - the Ilocano dialect.

    Rizal Remembered Through Ilocano Rendition of Masterpiece

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.