Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • proper n. One who maintains that the vowel points of the word Jehovah, in Hebrew, are the proper vowels of that word; -- opposed to adonist.
  • proper n. The writer of the passages of the Old Testament, especially those of the Pentateuch, in which the Supreme Being is styled Jehovah. See Elohist.
  • proper n. A member of the Jehovah's Witnesses.
  • proper n. Anyone who uses the word "Jehovah" as the name of God in worship.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. One who maintains that the vowel points of the word Jehovah, in Hebrew, are the proper vowels of that word; -- opposed to adonist.
  • n. The writer of the passages of the Old Testament, especially those of the Pentateuch, in which the Supreme Being is styled Jehovah. See Elohist.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The supposed author of certain passages of the Pentateuch in which God is always spoken of as Jehovah. Also Jahvist. See Elohist.
  • n. One who maintains that the vowel-points annexed to the word Jehovah in Hebrew are the proper vowels of the word, and express the true pronunciation.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • This combination of Deuteronomy with the Jehovist was the beginning of the combination of narrative and law; and the fact that this precedent was before the author of the Priestly

    Prolegomena

  • Jehovist, e.g., who traces the descent of shepherds, musicians, and workers in metal to antediluvian times (Gen.iv. 19-22), cannot be the Jehovist who told the story of the Flood, which interrupted the continuity of human life.

    Introduction to the Old Testament

  • The Jehovist is terse, graphic, and poetic; it is this source in which occurs the fine description of the sending forth of the raven and the dove, viii.

    Introduction to the Old Testament

  • It was always particularly hard to reconcile the apparently conflicting estimates of the duration of the Flood; but as soon as the sources are separated, it becomes clear that, according to the Jehovist, it lasted sixty-eight days, according to the other source over a year

    Introduction to the Old Testament

  • Jehovist and Elohist of the Hexateuch; but considering the fact that the older notices in i. -ii. 5, on account of the prominence of Judah and for other reasons, are usually assigned to J, and that some of the characteristics of these two documents recur in the course of the book, the hypothesis that J and E are continued at least into

    Introduction to the Old Testament

  • These considerations suggest that at any rate as far as 2 Samuel viii. -- for it is universally admitted that 2 Samuel ix. -xx. is homogeneous -- there are at least two sources, which some would identify, though upon grounds that are not altogether convincing, with the Jehovist and Elohist documents in the Hexateuch.

    Introduction to the Old Testament

  • It has its origin in that author whose book is called that of the Jehovist, or, more lately, the judaico-prophetic book; and who, among all those that have contributed stones to the building of the

    The Theories of Darwin and Their Relation to Philosophy, Religion, and Morality

  • A comparison of the two narratives shows that all which relates to the creation of Eve, the Garden of Eden, and Adam's transgression, exists only in the Jehovist text.

    The Necessity of Atheism

  • Lenormant, a distinguished Catholic Orientalist, in the preface to his "Origines de l'histoire d'apr├Ęs la Bible et les traditions des peuples Orientaux" (1880-84), declared no longer tenable the traditional unity of authorship for the Pentateuch, and admitted as demonstrated that the fundamental sources of its first four books were a Jehovist and Elohist document, each inspired and united by a

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 4: Clandestinity-Diocesan Chancery

  • Hupfeld, in 1853, found four instead of three documents in the Pentateuch, viz., the first Elohist, comprising the priestly law, a second Elohist (hitherto unsuspected except by a forgotten investigator, Ilgen), the Jehovist, and the

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 4: Clandestinity-Diocesan Chancery

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.