Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A set phrase in the Southern United States used mainly by Southern politicians and authors who wanted to illustrate the importance of the crop to southern economy.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Perhaps the counsellors of King Cotton think that in this case it will; but all history teaches us another lesson.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 07, No. 42, April, 1861

  • It seems but reasonable that King Cotton, who made the war, should aid in defraying its expenses; and it is also just that England and France, his chief allies, should pay their tribute for the suppression of the revolt they did so much to encourage.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 17, No. 103, May, 1866

  • This temporary restoration of King Cotton saddled the farmer with debt and delayed agricultural diversification and industrial beginnings. 71

    The Rise of Cotton Mills in the South

  • There was a new monarch, King Cotton, and his empire depended upon slaves.

    The Profits of Religion: An Essay in Economic Interpretation

  • To speak of nothing else, there must be a military force kept constantly on foot; and the ministers of King Cotton will find that the charge made by a standing army on the finances of the new empire is likely to be far more serious and damaging than can be compensated by the glory of a great many such "spirited charges" as that by which

    The Writings of James Russell Lowell in Prose and Poetry, Volume V Political Essays

  • All along the bluff, the seventy-five thousand loyal subjects erupted in thunderous cheers: Hail, King Cotton and His Queen!

    NPR Topics: News

  • HOT COTTON: Blues rock band King Cotton takes a little road trip to play at 10 p.m.

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  • To speak of nothing else, there must be a military force kept constantly on foot; and the ministers of King Cotton will find that the charge made by a standing army on the finances of the new empire is likely to be far more serious and damaging than can be compensated by the glory of a great many such "spirited charges" as that by which Colonel Pettigrew and his gallant rifles took Fort Pinckney, with its garrison of one engineer officer and its armament of no guns.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 07, No. 40, February, 1861

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