Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • proper n. An influential Chinese philosopher and founder of Taoism who lived 604-c 531 bc

Etymologies

Pinyin romanisation of the Chinese 老子 (Lǎo Zǐ). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • In other words, they were independent writings and not versions of or excerpts from a text called Laozi, which in this scenario did not yet exist when the Guodian texts were made.

    Laozi

  • The text, known as the Laozi or Daodejing (The Book of the Way and Its Power), is considered sacred to 20 million Daoists worldwide and has been widely read and memorized by educated Chinese for centuries.

    Laozi Debate

  • We speak of Laozi as the author of the Daode jing or Confucius as the author of the Confucian odes.

    Jesus, Poets and Prophets

  • B.C.E.) The putative author of the Daode jing (Classic of the Way and Virtue, also simply known as the Laozi) was said to have come from Chu.

    3. Daoism

  • It is common for theorists to treat 'Laozi' as a definite description referring to “whoever wrote the Daode Jing. ”” Many thus regard the question of his existence as equivalent to the question of his authorship of at least a part of the text ” hence improbable given current textual theory.

    Taoism

  • Note that Laozi and other classical thinkers also drew a connection between good, limited government in general and prosperity in particular.

    Don't Discount Chinese Liberalism

  • We first see it with philosopher Laozi, the founder of Taoism, in the sixth century B.C. Laozi articulated a political philosophy that has come to be known as wuwei , or inaction.

    Don't Discount Chinese Liberalism

  • Pascal Deloche/Godong/Corbis The Taoist sage Laozi was one of the world's first classical liberals.

    Don't Discount Chinese Liberalism

  • We first see it with philosopher Laozi, the founder of Taoism, in the sixth century B.C. Laozi articulated a political philosophy that has come to be known as wuwei, or inaction.

    The Ancient Roots of Chinese Liberalism

  • Pascal Deloche/Godong/Corbis The Taoist sage Laozi: 'The more prohibitions there are, the poorer the people become.'

    The Ancient Roots of Chinese Liberalism

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