Definitions

Sorry, no definitions found.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • ’ ‘She is hight, ’ quoth the curate, ‘the Princess Micomicona; for her kingdom being called Micomicon, it is evident she must be termed so.

    The Fourth Book. II. Which Treats of the Discretion of the Beautiful Dorothea, and the Artificial Manner Used to Dissuade the Amorous Knight from Continuing His Penance; and How He Was Gotten Away; with Many Other Delightful and Pleasant Occurrences

  • But he bore all with cheerfulness, being persuaded that his master had now fairly started and was just on the point of becoming an emperor; for he felt no doubt at all that he would marry this princess, and be king of Micomicon at least.

    Don Quixote

  • "She is called the Princess Micomicona," said the curate; "for as her kingdom is Micomicon, it is clear that must be her name."

    Don Quixote

  • Princess Micomicona, queen of the great kingdom of Micomicon of

    Don Quixote

  • Sancho, "but that I take it to be sure and certain that this lady, who calls herself queen of the great kingdom of Micomicon, is no more so than my mother; for, if she was what she says, she would not go rubbing noses with one that is here every instant and behind every door."

    Don Quixote

  • For his imagination was so wrought upon by the adventure he was going to accomplish, that it made him dream he had already reached the kingdom of Micomicon, and was engaged in combat with his enemy; and believing he was laying on the giant, he had given so many sword cuts to the skins that the whole room was full of wine.

    Don Quixote

  • For the imagination of the adventure which he had undertaken to finish, was so bent upon it, as it made him to dream that he was already arrived at the kingdom of Micomicon, and that he was then in combat with his enemy, and he had given so many blows on the wine-bags, supposing them to be giants, as all the whole chamber flowed with wine.

    The Fourth Book. VIII. Wherein Is Ended the History of the Curious-Impertinent: and Likewise Recounted the Rough Encounter and Conflict Passed between Don Quixote and Certain Bags of Red Wine

  • For his imagination was so full of the adventure in front of him that he dreamed that he had already arrived at Micomicon, and was there in combat with his enemy; and he had given so many blows to the wine-bags, supposing them to be the giant, that the whole chamber flowed with wine.

    The Junior Classics — Volume 4

  • As for Sancho, who trudged along on foot, he could not help grieving for the loss of his Dapple; but he bore it all with patience, for now he saw his master on the way to marry a princess, and so become at least King of Micomicon, though it grieved him to think that that country was peopled by blackamoors, and that when he became a ruler his vassals would all be black.

    The Junior Classics — Volume 4

  • But the best jest of all, he was all this time fast asleep; for the thoughts of the adventure he had undertaken had so wrought on his imagination that his depraved fancy had in his sleep represented to him the kingdom Micomicon, and the giant; and dreaming that he was then fighting him, he assaulted the wine skins so desperately that he set the whole chamber afloat with good wine.

    The Children's Hour, v 5. Stories From Seven Old Favorites

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.