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Etymologies

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Examples

  • August 2, 1841: While making a speech in Plymouth, England, Richard Owen combines the Greek words deinos (fearfully great) and sauros (lizard) and introduces the word “dinosaur” to describe fossilized reptiles.

    In the Belly of the Beast

  • "dinosaur" was coined in 1842 by British comparative anatomist Richard Owen, from the Greek words deinos meaning "terrible" and sauros meaning "lizard" or

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  • Do you suppose the Republican Party would have a policy of disenfranchising people such as Richard Owen, Georges Cuvier, or Lord Kelvin, from the halls of science?

    Worse than I thought in Iowa - The Panda's Thumb

  • The term "dinosaur" derived from the English paleontologist Richard Owen in 1842 and in essence it means "terrible, powerful, wondrous lizard."

    Lance Simmens: Dinosaurs and Fossil Fools

  • Richard Owen woke just as they reached the "temporary" wooden astronomy base station.

    I Don’t Understand ?

  • Richard Owen paused with his hand on the telephone, then snorted.

    I Don’t Understand ?

  • "You'll turn left at the next actual road," Richard Owen said.

    I Don’t Understand ?

  • Richard Owen, a question: If a gang of 10 thugs came into your house and killed your wife, are you going to seek the prosecution of just one of them because you lost only one family member, and then hope the gang disbands and doesn't hurt any other families?

    On Thursday, the Legg report will be published along with...

  • Little-known Dinotopia fact: The character named “Orchardwine” who Arthur Denison meets at the hatchery looks a lot like Richard Owen, the British scientist who coined the word “Dinosaur” in 1841.

    Orchardwine = Richard Owen

  • I was very impressed with the skill of Professors Graham Mitchell and Joy Reidenberg, and the other experts doing the dissection, and I found my respect for Richard Owen a bitter foe of Darwin going up.

    THE GREATEST SHOW ON EARTH

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