Robinson Crusoe love

Robinson Crusoe

Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The hero of Daniel Defoe's novel Robinson Crusoe of 1719, a shipwrecked English sailor who, by virtue of his own ingenuity, survives for years on a small tropical island.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • proper n. A fictional castaway.
  • proper n. Denotes something isolated and independent

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the hero of Daniel Defoe's novel about a shipwrecked English sailor who survives on a small tropical island

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Defoe created an imaginary person, whom he called Robinson Crusoe, dressed up Selkirk's facts to suit the purpose of his story, and wrote the wonderful and undying story of Robinson Crusoe.

    The Great Round World and What Is Going On In It, Vol. 1, No. 15, February 18, 1897 A Weekly Magazine for Boys and Girls

  • I strolled along the boardwalk to a beach called Robinson Crusoe and paused at a villa with harmonica music seeping through a wall of tumbling geraniums; the red-white-and-pink flowers invited a few hungry bees to a sweet morning feast.

    Words in a French Life

  • My plan, as I settled it at last, had been to begin with Robinson Crusoe, which is the earliest really popular novel which we have in our language, and to continue the review so as to include the works of all

    An Autobiography

  • Its called Robinson Crusoe about a man who gets merooned on a dessert iland.

    Flowers for Algernon

  • With his next poem Browning spoke with a voice that, as our critic says, proved that he had found that he was not Robinson Crusoe, which is to say that he had found that the world contained a great number of people.

    Gilbert Keith Chesterton

  • This suggested the idea of Robinson Crusoe to Defoe, but he has greatly expanded the story.

    The Elson Readers, Book 5

  • He turned the leaves over: it was entitled Robinson Crusoe Told to the Children, and appeared to be perfectly genuine.

    Mystery Mile

  • My plan, as I settled it at last, had been to begin with Robinson Crusoe, which is the earliest really popular novel which we have in our language, and to continue the review so as to include the works of all English novelists of reputation, except those who might still be living when my task should be completed.

    Autobiography of Anthony Trollope

  • The idea of calling Robinson Crusoe an allegory was in all probability an after-thought, perhaps suggested by a derisive parody which had appeared, entitled The life and strange surprising adventures of Daniel de Foe, of London, Hosier, who lived all alone in the uninhabited island of Great Britain, and so forth.

    Daniel Defoe

  • "Reckon I'll let you take 'Robinson Crusoe' -- it's a bed-rock story.

    The Ridin' Kid from Powder River

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