Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Of or pertaining to the literary style and characters of plays by William Rowley (ca1585-1626), English playright.
  • adj. Of or pertaining to the work of (fictional) poet Thomas Rowley, a pseudonym of Thomas Chatterton (1752-1770), English poet.

Etymologies

From Rowley plus suffix -ian. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • 'Rowleian' language -- valuable evidence about old Bristol miraculously preserved in Rowley's chest.

    The Rowley Poems

  • Chatterton: while Malone in a mocking anti-Rowleian pamphlet shows that the similes from Homer in the _Battle of Hastings_ and elsewhere have often borrowed their rhymes from Pope!

    The Rowley Poems

  • _Ælla, a Tragycal Enterlude_ -- far the finest of the longer Rowleian poems -- the _Songe to Ælla_ and _The Bristowe Tragedy_ (the authorship of which last he appears in an unguarded moment to have acknowledged to his mother).

    The Rowley Poems

  • Bryant was a strong Pro-Rowleian and argues cleverly against the possibility of

    The Rowley Poems

  • Rowley's_ -- he is pro-Rowleian and criticizes Tyrwhitt's appendix.

    The Rowley Poems

  • Walpole however 'had not the happiness of understanding the Saxon language,' and it was not until after he had received a second letter from Chatterton, enclosing more Rowleian matter both prose and verse, that he consulted his friends Gray and Mason, who at once detected the forgery.

    The Rowley Poems

  • Rowleian manner, with strange spelling and uncouth words, but for the most part quite intelligible to the ordinary reader.

    The Rowley Poems

  • The room forms an irregular octagon, admitting light through narrow unglazed apertures upon the broken and scattered fragments of the famous Rowleian chests, that with the rubble and dust of centuries cover the floor.

    Three Years in Europe Places I Have Seen and People I Have Met

  • Tyrwhitt pointed out that the Rowleian dialect was not English of the fifteenth century, nor of any century, but a grotesque jumble of archaic words of very different periods and dialects.

    A History of English Romanticism in the Eighteenth Century

  • In his unfinished poem, "The Eve of St. Mark," there is a Rowleian accent in the passage imitative of early English, and in the loving description of the old volume of saints 'legends whence it is taken, with its

    A History of English Romanticism in the Eighteenth Century

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