Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • Samoset Died c. 1653. Native American leader and friend of the early colonists. He was the first to sell land to the Pilgrims (1625).

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The stars overhead vanished, and the Samoset swung four points off her course in the careless steersman's hands.

    Bunches of Knuckles

  • Arrangements quite extensive had been made for the celebration of Christmas on the yacht Samoset.

    Bunches of Knuckles

  • Duncan pulled shut the cover of the companion scuttle, and held on, waiting, the first drops of rain pelting his face, while the Samoset leaped violently ahead, at the same time heeling first to starboard then to port as the gusty pressures caught her winged-out sails.

    Bunches of Knuckles

  • The Samoset had been a trading schooner, when Duncan bought her in San Francisco and made alterations.

    Bunches of Knuckles

  • The Samoset rolled and righted on a sea, and in the light breeze her canvas gave forth a hollow thrum.

    Bunches of Knuckles

  • As they lifted on the smooth crest of a wave, Duncan turned to look where the Samoset made a vague blur in the darkness.

    Bunches of Knuckles

  • The Samoset, with fore - and main-sail winged out on either side, was slipping a lazy four-knots through the smooth sea.

    Bunches of Knuckles

  • He followed her gaze, and saw the Samoset, flag at half mast, rounding up and dropping anchor scarcely a hundred yards away.

    Bunches of Knuckles

  • For the cabin, raw bonita native style, turtle soup, omelette a la Samoset —

    Bunches of Knuckles

  • Samoset, an Abenaki Indian who could speak a little English, paid a friendly visit to the terrified colonists.

    Lorna Bright: Giving Thanks Begins With Letting Go

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