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Etymologies

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Examples

  • Steep "often sounds like a promotional film," it's "undeniably impressive," offers Nick Schager calls Steep "a skin-deep history lesson on extreme skiing."

    GreenCine Daily

  • The resulting film, "Steep," doesn't include any footage of Kye Petersen, the heart of Kerig's story.

    Summit Daily News - Top Stories

  • The project eventually was released as "Steep," a documentary that had a 2007 theatrical release and whose reviews were split right down the middle.

    Aspen Times - Top Stories

  • 'Darfur Now,' 'Steep' my week at the movies: 'Lars and the Real Girl' (finally), 'Rendition,' '30 Days of Night,'

    FlickFilosopher.com

  • That film became the documentary "Steep," but ultimately didn't use the footage of Kye Petersen in Chamonix.

    Vail Daily - Top Stories

  • It's remarkable how our columnists, pundits and policy makers seem to think there is no such thing as the law of economics "Downturn's Ugly Trademark: Steep, Lasting Drop in Wages," page one, Jan. 11.

    Wage Situation Is No Help to Jobless

  • Steep mountains behind, sea in front, flat lowlands inbetween with winding rivers...

    Australian floods: Why were we so surprised?

  • "Steep increases in raw-material prices may deter firms from recruiting, or drive selling prices even higher in order to protect margins," Chris Williamson , the chief economist at Markit, said in a statement.

    Pressure Builds on ECB Rate Setters

  • Steep price discounts were necessary and, after four years of sales, more than a third of the building remains unsold.

    One Brightening Prospect

  • Steep economic downturns cause large deficits, which is bad.

    Matthew Yglesias » Unemployment Forever

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