Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • proper n. A taxonomic order within the subclass Anapsida — the turtles, tortoises, and terrapins.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. tortoises and turtles

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Of all the many and varied forms of parareptiles that once thrived, only the Order Testudines (turtles and tortoises) survived beyond the Triassic Period.

    "My little world and all I see..."

  • This bird's name was not inspired by the reptilian order Testudines

    Mystery bird: dusky turtle dove, Streptopelia lugens

  • Cladistically inclined zoologists avoid the word ‘reptiles’ altogether, splitting them into Archosaurs (crocodiles, dinosaurs and birds), Lepidosaurs (snakes, lizards and the rare Sphenodon of New Zealand) and Testudines (turtles and tortoises).

    THE GREATEST SHOW ON EARTH

  • Only the Testudines and Squamata are represented in Canada by 17 aquatic or semi-aquatic species of turtles and 10 aquatic or semi-aquatic snakes.

    Reptile

  • The order Testudines includes turtles, the order Squamata includes lizards and snakes, the order Crocodylia contains crocodiles and alligators, and the order Rhynchocephalia contains the lizard-like tuataras.

    Reptile

  • Six reptile families of the order Testudines are represented in Canada: Chelydridae, Emydidae, Dermochelyidae, Cheloniidae, Trionychidae, and Kinosternidae.

    Turtle

  • Down with goofy primate covers, up with Testudines!

    Turtle Covers

  • In the book, he mentions a native Hawaiian islander, known to the reader as “Mr. Gor,” who confesses “a strong sexual attraction to creatures belonging to the order Testudines” 2 Schechner 387.

    Emysphilia

  • Sterrer W (2000) Hesperotestudo (Testudines: Testudinidae) from the Pleistocene of Bermuda, with comments on the phylogenetic position of the genus.

    PLoS ONE Alerts: New Articles

  • Order Testudines Family Chelydridae (Snapping turtles) (Source: Biodiversity Institute of Ontario)

    Reptile families

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