Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The religious opinions and principles of the founders of the Oxford movement, put forth in a series of 90 pamphlets entitled Tracts for the Times, published at Oxford, England (1833-1841).

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • proper n. The principles of the Tractarians.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The principles of the Tractarians, or of those persons accepting the teachings of the “Tracts for the Times.”

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A system of religious opinion and practice promulgated within the Church of England in a series of papers entitled “Tracts for the Times,” published at Oxford between 1833 and 1841.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. principles of the founders of the Oxford movement as expounded in pamphlets called `Tracts for the Times'

Etymologies

Tractarian +‎ -ism (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • He was conspicuous among the young men of his standing for the forwardness with which he took his side against "Tractarianism," and the vehemence of his dislike of it, and for the almost ostentatious and defiant prominence which he gave to the convictions and social habits of his school He expressed his scorn and disgust at the "donnishness," the coldness, the routine, the want of heart, which was all that he could see at Oxford out of the one small circle of his friends.

    Occasional Papers Selected from the Guardian, the Times, and the Saturday Review, 1846-1890

  • Reprints an earlier monograph about the effects of Tractarianism on nineteenth-century fiction. eBay

    Buying Books

  • This was looked on with relief not only by Catholics but also Anglicans, who inspired by Tractarianism, had begun to re-establish monasteries and convents.

    Archive 2009-04-01

  • Today I suddenly remembered the term, "Puseyism" - of course I would know that - which happens to be another name for "Tractarianism", and I realized my reference wasn't all that crazy.

    Blogs I don't like...

  • Here is the definition of Tractarianism: "The religious opinions and principles of the founders of the Oxford movement, put forth in a series of 90 pamphlets entitled Tracts for the Times, published at Oxford, England 1833–1841."

    Blogs I don't like...

  • Methodism, Tractarianism, were chiefly religious movements, interested in the kind of questions and moved by the sorts of motives which we have been talking about.

    Preaching and Paganism

  • With our Evangelicalism, Tractarianism, Scribeism, Pharisaism, we have ceased to front the _living fact_ -- we are as zealous as Scribes and

    Sermons Preached at Brighton Third Series

  • Tractarianism began to arouse the hostility, not only of the evangelical, but of the moderate churchmen, who could not help perceiving, in the ever deepening “catholicism” of the Oxford party, the dread approaches of Rome.

    Cardinal Manning: Part III

  • As did Evangelicalism to the old Low Church ideas, so has Tractarianism, which rose up in the middle of the nineteenth century, given a new interpretation to the old High Church views, which since then have been carried in the direction of

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 9: Laprade-Mass Liturgy

  • It was the era of Tractarianism and Brook Farm, and McMaster became a Catholic in

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 9: Laprade-Mass Liturgy

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