Tristram Shandy love

Tristram Shandy

Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • He was sometimes called Tristram Shandy and sometimes Yorick, a very great favourite of the gentlemen.

    Sterne

  • Major Dalton lent him a book called Tristram Shandy, but Sharpe could make neither head nor tail of it.

    Sharpe's Trafalgar

  • He ate some bread and cheese and read a book Gordonson had loaned him, a novel called Tristram Shandy, but he could not concentrate.

    A Place Called Freedom

  • It equally recalled Tristram Shandy and The Face on the Cutting-Room Floor, and anticipated David Lynch, while some call it the thinking man's The Name of the Rose.

    The Independent - Frontpage RSS Feed

  • George's trial, Lord Ferrers's, and the account of him; a fashionable thing called Tristram Shandy, and my Lord Lyttelton's new Dialogues of the Dead, or rather Dead Dialogues; and something less valuable still than any of these, but which I flatter myself you will not despise; it is my own print, done from a picture that is reckoned very like -- you must allow for the difference that twenty years since you saw me have made.

    The Letters of Horace Walpole, Earl of Orford — Volume 3

  • In his little book on Gogol, Nabokov writes of Gogolian metaphors in which a whole distracting world is contained, perhaps a sign of the immense influence of "Tristram Shandy," with its perpetual digressions, on Russian literature.

    John Cheever's Cruel Paradoxes

  • In 1983, this sort of livre de goofball met the livre de peintre in John Baldessari's appropriately enigmatic photocollage version of "Tristram Shandy," the prophetically nonlinear 18th-century novel by Laurence Sterne.

    Making Book The Hard Way

  • Just started 'Tristram Shandy' supposedly one of the nuttiest books ever written and was more or less the first post-modern novel if you dont count 'Don Quixote'.

    the sound of one hand clapping

  • Dr. Johnson, who understood neither Fiddling nor painting, who collected neither coins nor cockle-shells, maggots nor butterflies, was clearly of the same opinion as the author of "Tristram Shandy," that there is no disputing against hobby-horses.

    The Violin Its Famous Makers and Their Imitators

  • Indeed, I live upon the essays of Elia, as Hazlitt did upon "Tristram Shandy," as

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 11, No. 67, May, 1863

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