Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • See Elea.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A genus of semi-aquatic water-bugs, typical of the family Veliidæ.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • He was buried by a decree of the people within the city near the place called Velia, and all his family were given the privilege of burial there.

    Plutarch's Lives, Volume I

  • 'Velia's fountains,' a lake in the Umbrian hills beyond Reate.

    The Aeneid of Virgil Translated into English Verse by E. Fairfax Taylor

  • "And I'll give mine," Velia broke in, coming lightly up the hill toward them.

    Science Fiction, Fantasy, Horror: Elak Of Atlantis - Henry Kuttner

  • Elak wants her to say, but Velia smiled and shook her head.

    Science Fiction, Fantasy, Horror: Elak Of Atlantis - Henry Kuttner

  • Velia, who was the first to discover that most ingenious device of refuting hypotheses by the method of self-inconsistency, that same Zeno was — so Plato asserts — by far the most striking in appearance of all the men of his generation.

    The Defense

  • Passing the residence of the Rex Sacrorum on the Velia, Gaius Fonteius spoke again.

    Antony and Cleopatra

  • From where he stood at the top of the Velia, Octavian could see down into the Forum Romanum and beyond it to the Capitoline Mount; if he turned to face the other way, he could look across the swamps of the Palus Ceroliae all the way along the Sacra Via to the Servian Walls.

    Antony and Cleopatra

  • From the Velia he walked through the lichen-whiskered ancient pillars of the Porta Mugonia and ascended the Palatine Mount at its less fashionable end.

    Antony and Cleopatra

  • The same opinion is found in Parmenides of Velia, with the exception of a few small details where he differed from Empedocles.

    The Chicago Blog: An excerpt from The Birthday Book by Censorinus

  • When at last we reached the coast at Velia, Cicero decided it would be quicker to board a ship and hug the coast—this, despite the risk of winter storms and pirates, and his own marked aversion to traveling by boat, for he had been warned by a Sibyl that his death would somehow be connected with the sea.

    Imperium

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