Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A pre-Incan empire with links to the contemporaneous civilization at Tiahuanaco, developing around the 10th century in the Peruvian highlands and spreading to encompass more than half of modern-day Peru before collapsing around 1200.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • My ancestral home in Wari in "old Dhaka" is not far from the University campus in Ramna.

    Amartya Sen - Autobiography

  • Evidence from the site shows the Wari may have maintained their empire in part by entertaining locals rather than forcing them to submit to imperial control.

    Trophy Skulls and Beer

  • As we stand among the ruins, Nash tells me the Wari -- usually thought of as a fairly bloodthirsty bunch, based on pottery painted with images of warriors, beheadings, and bound captives -- may have actually wooed local leaders with a potent mix of corn beer and hallucinogens.

    Trophy Skulls and Beer

  • The Wari likely thought of Cerro Baúl as sacred; even now, the ground here is littered with carefully arranged pebbles in the shape of houses or farms and the occasional empty bottle of liquor, left behind by locals as offerings to the spirit of the mountain.

    Trophy Skulls and Beer

  • It may be the key to understanding how the Wari managed to control a state that stretched some 800 miles to the north.

    Trophy Skulls and Beer

  • And mountaintop temples would have had great views of other peaks, perhaps an important element of Wari rituals.

    Trophy Skulls and Beer

  • A team of archaeologists led by Donna Nash and Ryan Williams of the Field Museum in Chicago excavates the remains of a Wari palace at Cerro Baúl in southern Peru.

    Trophy Skulls and Beer

  • This labeled aerial photo of Cerro Mejía shows the summit and its boundary walls (purple), the slopes and its division into neighborhoods by large walls (green), and the Wari canal (light blue).

    Digging at Peru's Cerro Mejía

  • It is also possible that the Wari developed Moquegua as a colony for settlers seeking access to land or opportunities in a new region.

    Digging at Peru's Cerro Mejía

  • There are many Wari sites and materials in the Majes/Chuquibamba region and so it is possible that the people who built and lived in Unit 17 were settlers forcibly moved by the Wari Empire from their homeland 125 miles away to Moquegua.

    Digging at Peru's Cerro Mejía

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.