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Examples

  • My claim is that, since some time in the first decades of the twentieth century—after the best work of Edith Wharton and Willa Cather, that is—American novelists have narrowed the idea of sex to genital friction.

    Archive 2010-02-01

  • [105] As stressed by Cherny ( "Willa Cather," pp. 213-15), who traces Cather's development of the theme through the various situations in which the novel's characters, though influenced or constrained by circumstances, are shown to retain their power of choice.

    Mises Institute Daily Articles (Full-text version)

  • Willa Cather, D.H. Lawrence, Georgia O'Keeffe and Agnes Martin all found blank canvases, literal and figurative, in the Southwest's wide-open deserts and skies.

    Take Monday Off: Santa Fe and Taos

  • One of the better essays in the book, Tom Lutz's "Cather and the Regional Imagination," is only secondarily about Willa Cather.

    What Killed American Lit.

  • There's also a companion Henry VIII mug where eight wives lose their heads, and one titled "Great Gays Out Of The Closet" that lets you help Willa Cather , Michelangelo, Walt Whitman , James Baldwin , Oscar Wilde , etc., celebrate their sexuality.

    Hardware Sociology

  • She was a Minneapolis-born freelance writer who lived in Greenwich Village for much of her life, traveling with such free thinkers and literary lights as Mabel Dodge, Emma Goldman, Theodore Dreiser, Willa Cather and Eugene O'Neill.

    Brenda, My Darling: The Love Letters of Fridtjof Nansen to Brenda Ueland

  • What looks like a book about the end of the world, and good riddance, turns out to be about something closer to Willa Cather's famous line, "The soul of another is a dark forest."

    A Master Back in the Saddle

  • Cleopatra, one of Taylor's gaudiest roles, does make a nice change from Susan B. Anthony or Willa Cather as a subject of feminist discussion, but the book's thesis is too tenuous, the evidence too sparse, to be persuasive.

    Women's Liz

  • Indeed, such a law would make it difficult to teach the "immoral" lessons of many classics of English language literature, including the works of Shakespeare, Chaucer, James Joyce, Mark Twain, Willa Cather, Scott Fitzgerald, James Agee, or Doris Lessing.

    Paul Stoller: Arizona Airheads

  • Not wanting any pressure, I booked a room at the Inn at Whale Cove Cottages where Willa Cather built a cottage in the 20s.

    Margie Goldsmith: Biking a Wild Isle in the Bay of Fundy

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