Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Alternative spelling of X chromosome.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • He tries to rationalize the mistake of being born in a boy's body, concluding that his second X-chromosome must have gotten accidentally tossed in the garbage; voices his plans to marry his friend and neighbor Jerome when he's finally not a boy; and loves dresses, makeup, and the not-Barbie-not-even-a-little-bit doll Pam.

    Marion Johnson: Where to Find Positive LGBT Characters in Pop Culture

  • Similarly there is a 50 percentchance that he will inherit the X-chromosome with the normal SH2D1A gene copy.

    X-linked Lymphoproliferative Syndrome

  • The Y-chromosome in males does not contain the same genesthat are carried on the X-chromosome.

    X-linked Lymphoproliferative Syndrome

  • Since males have a single X-chromosome, they have only one copy of the SH2D1A gene.

    X-linked Lymphoproliferative Syndrome

  • If a man with X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome (and hence an SH2D1A alteration) has children with a female partner who does not carry an alteration in SH2D1A, he will either pass on a Y-chromosome to his sons (who will therefore be unaffected by the syndrome) or he will pass the X-chromosome with the SH2D1A alteration to his daughters (who will be X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome carriers).

    X-linked Lymphoproliferative Syndrome

  • If a woman has one X-chromosome with an alteration in SH2D1A and her other X-chromosome has a normal SH2D1A gene, she is said to be a “carrier.”

    X-linked Lymphoproliferative Syndrome

  • This female carrier, however, can pass her X-chromosome with the SH2D1A alteration to a proportion of her future children.

    X-linked Lymphoproliferative Syndrome

  • This is because she will have one X-chromosome with an alteration in the SH2D1A gene (inherited from her mother) and one X-chromosome with a normal copy of the SH2D1A gene (inherited from her father).

    X-linked Lymphoproliferative Syndrome

  • A male child will always receive an X-chromosome from his mother and a Y-chromosome from his father.

    X-linked Lymphoproliferative Syndrome

  • Females have two X-chromosomes, whereas males have one X-chromosome and one Y-chromosome.

    X-linked Lymphoproliferative Syndrome

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