Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • An ancient city of Lycia in present-day southwest Turkey. It was besieged and taken by the Persians (c. 546 B.C.) and the Romans (c. 42 B.C.). Both times the residents destroyed the city before surrendering.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • At 13 I created the name Xanthus based on the mythical sound - the band never quite formed around the name.

    impaled gail, lynched lyndon

  • The waters of the Scamander had the singular property of giving a beautiful colour to the hair or wool of such animals as bathed in them; hence the three goddesses, Minerva, Juno, and Venus, bathed there before they appeared before Paris to obtain the golden apple: the name Xanthus,

    The Iliad of Homer

  • Nor less on land, I call Xanthus and Simoïs to witness, hath been my care of thine Aeneas.

    The Aeneid of Virgil

  • a beautiful colour to the hair or wool of such animals as bathed in them; hence the three goddesses, Minerva, Juno, and Venus, bathed there before they appeared before Paris to obtain the golden apple: the name Xanthus, "yellow," was given to the Scamander, from the peculiar colour of its waters, still applicable to the Mendere, the yellow colour of whose waters attracts the attention of travellers.

    The Iliad

  • It is not over the plain before Troy that the river now flows; its waters have edged away far towards the north, since the day that “divine Scamander” (whom the gods call Xanthus) went down to do battle for Ilion, “with Mars, and Phoebus, and Latona, and Diana glorying in her arrows, and Venus the lover of smiles.”

    Eothen

  • Whom the Gods call Xanthus, and men call Scamander.

    The CRATYLUS

  • Well, and about this river - to know that he ought to be called Xanthus and not Scamander - is not that a solemn lesson?

    The CRATYLUS

  • 'Whom,' as he says, 'the Gods call Xanthus, and men call Scamander.'

    Cratylus

  • Gods and men to the same things, as in the verse about the river God who fought with Hephaestus, 'whom the Gods call Xanthus, and men call

    Cratylus

  • Against Vulcan also was the great deep-eddying river, which the gods call Xanthus, and men the Scamander.

    The Iliad of Homer (1873)

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