Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. An intensely poisonous alkaloid, extracted from aconite.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. An intensely poisonous alkaloid, extracted from aconite.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I knew enough about poisons to be certain that the flask did not contain arsenic or strychnine, but that left a hundred others, from aconitine, which would kill with an imperceptible amount, to — “Ten seconds.”

    A Monstrous Regiment of Women

  • Dr. Mrugowsky used them as targets for his aconitine nitrate experiment, shooting projectiles into their thighs to prove that it would invariably bring death within two hours.

    Briar Rose

  • Poisonous property depends upon an alkaloid, aconitine.

    Aids to Forensic Medicine and Toxicology

  • Effects on mice, etc. A cadaveric alkaloid or ptomaine has been found in the body, possessing many of the actions of aconitine.

    Aids to Forensic Medicine and Toxicology

  • With reference to this fact, the author, in 1885, made experiments with alcohol and strychnine, and continued his researches in the use of chloral and aconitine with results favorable to the method employed, which is as follows:

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 586, March 26, 1887

  • With aconitine, diuresis was not always established, and when it failed the animal died in convulsions.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 586, March 26, 1887

  • The author succeeded in rescuing animals poisoned by alcohol, strychnine, chloral, and aconitine.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 586, March 26, 1887

  • He began to be afraid that some accident had happened to her, and often regretted that he had prevented her taking the aconitine when she had been so anxious to try its effect.

    Lord Arthur Savile's Crime

  • "I should like to take it now," said Lady Clementina, holding up to the light the little transparent capsule, with its floating bubble of liquid aconitine.

    Lord Arthur Savile's Crime

  • Lord Arthur was a good deal puzzled at the technical terms used in both books, and had begun to regret that he had not paid more attention to his classics at Oxford, when in the second volume of Erskine, he found a very interesting and complete account of the properties of aconitine, written in fairly clear English.

    Lord Arthur Savile's Crime

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